Wildlife

Wildlife
Alligators
by Dough, Wynne. In North Carolina the American alligator inhabits fresh and estuarine bodies of water as far west as Robeson and Cumberland Counties, building dens with submerged entrances at the water's edge. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
American Shad (from NC WINS)
by Ashley, Keith, Dockendorf, Kevin. American Shad Alosa sapidissima by Keith Ashley Update and revision by Kevin Dockendorf, Fisheries BiologistNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Atlantic Sturgeon (from NC WINS)
by Wynne, Bennett, Ashley, Keith. Atlantic Sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus (Oxyrinchus means “sharp snout”.) by Keith Ashley and Bennett WynneNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Audubon Society of North Carolina
by Orr, Oliver H., Jr. For a relatively brief period, the Audubon Society of North Carolina (ASNC) was perhaps the most important of the state Audubon societies formed as a part of the bird protection movement generated by [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Beaver (from NC WINS)
by Olfenbuttel, Colleen, Sumner, Perry W., McGrath, Chris. Beaver Castor canadensis Written by Chris McGrath, Colleen Olfenbuttel, Black Bear and Furbearer Biologist, and Perry Sumner, NCWRC.North Carolina Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Beavers
by Hegyi, Laura. Beavers- the largest North American rodents, recognized by their rich brown fur, webbed hind paws, and large, flat tails- were trapped almost to extinction in North Carolina as well as in much of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bird, Cardinal
by Case, Steven. State Bird of North Carolina: Cardinal By Steven Case NC Government & Heritage Library, 2011 See also: North Carolina State Symbols and Official Adoptions main page Listen to this [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Black Bear (from NC WINS)
by Krupnick, Jane, Jones, Mark D. Black Bear Ursus americanus by Mark D. Jones, Jane Krupnick, and Colleen OlfenbutteNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, updated [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Black Crappie and White Crappie (from NC WINS)
by Hammers, Brad E., Oakley, N. Corey. Black Crappie and White Crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus and Pomoxis annularis Written by Brad E. Hammers updated by N. Corey OakleyNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Black Duck (from NC WINS)
by Fuller, Joe, Howell, Doug. Black Duck Anas rubripes by Joe Fuller Updated by Doug HowellNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission Classification Class: [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Bluegill (from NC WINS)
by Hammers, Brad E., Ashley, Keith, Bryant, Shari L. Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus Written by Brad E. Hammers and Shari L. Bryant Updated by Keith Ashley, fisheries biologistNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Bobcat (from NC WINS)
by Olfenbuttel, Colleen, Sawyer, David, Sumner, Perry W. Bobcat Felis rufus Written by Dan Bryant, Colleen Olfenbuttel, Black bear and furbearer biologist–NCWRC, David Sawyer, and Perry Sumner.North Carolina Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Butterfly, Eastern tiger swallowtail
by Underhill, Michelle Czaikowski, Kemp, Amy. State Butterfly of North Carolina: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail by Michelle Czaikowski Underhill and Amy Kemp NC Government & Heritage Library, 2017. See also: North Carolina State [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Canada Goose (from NC WINS)
by Fuller, Joe, Martin, Kyle. Canada Goose Branta canadensis Originally written by Kyle Martin. Re-written by Joe Fuller, Migratory Game Bird Coordinator, NCWRCNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Canvasback Duck (from NC WINS)
by Howell, Doug. canvasback Duck Aythya valisineria Written by Jay D. Davis. Re-written by Doug Howell, Waterfowl Biologist –NCWRCNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Carolina Madtom (from NC WINS)
by Watson, Brian T., Wood, Chris. Carolina Madtom Noturus furiosus by Brian T. Watson, Division of Inland Fisheries Updated by Chris WoodNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Carolina Northern Flying Squirrel (from NC WINS)
by Boynton, Allen, Kelly, Christine. Carolina Northern Flying Squirrel Glaucomys sabrinus coloratus by Allen Boynton Updated in 2007 by Chris KellyNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Carolina Panther
by Humphreys, Charles R. Previously identified as Felis concolor couguar but more recently as Puma concolor couguar, the cautious and intelligent Carolina panther, once prevalent in North Carolina, is now considered extinct [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Carolina Parakeet
by Powell, William S., Dough, Wynne. The Carolina parakeet (Conuropsis carolinensis), now extinct, was found in large numbers in the region of the Carolinas and Virginia when the first European colonists arrived. Sir Walter Raleigh [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Catalpa Tree
by Mills, Jerry Leath. The catalpa tree in North Carolina belongs to the southern species Catalpa bignonioides, native to Georgia and Florida but thoroughly naturalized throughout the southeastern quarter of the United [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Chinquapin
by Southern, David. Chinquapin, or "chinkapin," is a diminutive cousin of the American chestnut. Although their name derives from eastern-dwelling Algonquian Indian language, chinquapin trees are known as far west as [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Clapper Rail (from NC WINS)
by Fuller, Joe. Clapper Rail Rallus longirostris by Joe FullerNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission Classification Class: Aves Order: [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Clay-Bank
by Powell, William S. Clay-Bank by William S. Powell, 2006 "Clay-bank" is a Mountain designation for a horse whose color resembles that of the substratum of clay that storm waters uncover in the narrow valleys of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Corn Snake (from NC WINS)
by Beane, Jeff, Godfrey, Matthew, Boynton, Allen. Corn Snake Elaphe guttata by Allen Boynton Updated by Jeff Beane and Matthew GodfreyNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. Classification Class: [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Cottonmouth (from NC WINS)
by Conant, Therese, Durso, Andrew M., Hall, Jeff. Cottonmouth Agkistrodon piscivorus by Therese Conant Updated by Andrew M. Durso and Jeff HallNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Cougar (from NC WINS)
by Olfenbuttel, Colleen, Krupnick, Jane, Mains, Allison, Dean, Jim. Eastern Cougar Felis concolor by Jane Krupnick Updated by Allison Mains, Jim Dean and Colleen OlfenbuttelNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Coyote (from NC WINS)
by Olfenbuttel, Colleen, Thomas, Jack, Sumner, Perry W. Coyote Canis latrans by Geriann Albers, Colleen Olfenbuttel, Perry W. Sumner, and Jack ThomasNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, updated [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Crayfish (from NC WINS)
by Nichols, Robert B., Friday, Sarah. Crayfish Cambarus bartoni Written by Sarah Friday Updated by Robert NicholsNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. Classification Class: [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Deertongue
by Bullard, A. J. Deertongue, also called dog-tongue and vanilla plant (Trilisa odoratissima), is native to the U.S. coastal region from North Carolina to Florida. It is characterized by basal clusters of dog- or [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Diamondback Terrapin (from NC WINS)
by Burge, Kimberly, Conant, Therese, Weeks, Kendrick, Harden, Leigh Anne. Diamondback Terrapin See also: Terrapins Malaclemys terrapin by Therese Conant Updated by Kendrick Weeks, Leigh Anne Harden, and Kimberly BurgeNorth Carolina [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Doodlebugs
by Powell, William S. Doodlebugs, or ant lions, belong to the order of insects Neuroptera and are found in many parts of the world, including much of North Carolina. They came to be called doodlebugs about 1866. The [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Eagles
by Keighton, Jim. While the presence of bald eagles has been noted in all U.S. states except Hawaii, their existence in North Carolina, until late in the twentieth century, has seldom been recorded far from the larger [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Eastern Box Turtle (from NC WINS)
by Burge, Kimberly, Jones, Melissa. Eastern Box Turtle Terrapene carolina by Kimberly Burge and Melissa Jones, edited by Jeff Hall.North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Eastern wild turkey (from NC WINS)
by Howard, Brad. Eastern Wild Turkey Meleagris gallopavo by Brad Howard Updated 2011 by Evin Stanford, Surveys and Research Biologist Additional information about the Eastern Wild [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
El insecto del estado
by . El insecto del estado Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. Oficina de Archivos e [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
El mamífero del estado
by . De las cuatro especies de ardillas de Carolina del Norte, la ardilla gris (Sciurus carolinensis) es la más común. Estas ardillas de rabo tupido, trepadoras acrobáticas son más abundantes en los [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
El pájaro del estado
by . El pájaro del estado Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Raleigh, 2011. El cardenal fue seleccionado por [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
El pez de agua salada del estado
by . El pez de agua salada del estado Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Raleigh, 2011. La Asamblea General de 1971 [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
El reptil del estado
by . La Asamblea General de 1979 adoptó la tortuga como el reptil del estado,designando la tortuga de caja del este (Terrapene carolina) como el emblema que representa las tortugas que habitan en Carolina [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
Endangered Species
by Templeton, Lee Plummer, Dotterer, Rebecca. Endangered Species by Rebecca Dotterer and Lee Plummer Templeton, 2006 See also: Beavers; Carolina Panther; Carolina Parakeet; Eagles; Carolina Northern Flying Squirrel (from NC WINS); [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fossils
by Glynn, Elizabeth Scheld, Wait, Douglas A. Fossilized remains of animal and plant life have been discovered at numerous locations in North Carolina, primarily in the sedimentary rock formations of the eastern coastal plain. Fossils often are [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fox Squirrel (from NC WINS)
by Olfenbuttel, Colleen, Carraway, Mike. Fox Squirrel Sciurus niger by Mike Carraway, Colleen Olfenbuttel, and Brandon SherrillNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. Updated [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Frog, Pine Barren Treefrog
by Horton, Emily S. State Frog of North Carolina: Pine Barren Treefrog by Emily Horton NC Government & Heritage Library, 2013 See also: North Carolina State Symbols and Official Adoptions main [...] (from NCpedia.)
Gray Fox (from NC WINS)
by Olfenbuttel, Colleen, Sumner, Perry W. Gray Fox Urocyon cinereoargenteus by Colleen Olfenbuttel and Perry SumnerNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission Classification Class: [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Gray Squirrel (from NC WINS)
by Sharpe, Terry. Eastern Gray Squirrel Sciurus carolinensis by Terry Sharpe and Brandon SherrillNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, Updated 2017. See Also: State [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Great Horned Owl (from NC WINS)
by Johns, Mark E., Irvin, Wayne. Great Horned Owl Bubo virginianus Written by Wayne Irvin Contributions to original by Mark E. JohnsNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Heidi the Cross-Eyed Opossum
by Childs, T. Mike. Heidi the Cross-Eyed Opossum is a North Carolina-born female opossum who found fame in a German zoo and became a short-lived Internet celebrity in 2011.  She first appeared in a photo spread on new [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Horses
by Meyer, Deborah Raenette. Horses by Deborah Raenette Meyer, 2006 See also: Horse Racing; Mules; Wild [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hunting
by Williams, Wiley J., Hegyi, Laura. Hunting in North Carolina is a popular and economically significant recreational activity as well as an important focus of the state's governmental agencies in charge of wildlife preservation and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Jerusalem Oak
by Bullard, A. J. Jerusalem oak (Chenopodium ambrosioides) is a weedy perennial plant found throughout North Carolina and the United States. Those with an eastern, rural North Carolina background use the name [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Jovian
by Smith, Chris T. Jovian is a Coquerel’s sifaka (a species of lemur) chosen to star in the title role of the popular PBS children's television series Zoboomafoo, which began airing in 1999. Jovian was born April 10, [...] (from NCpedia.)
Junebugs
by Mills, Jerry Leath. Junebugs, more properly called green June beetles, are common to North Carolina and other southeastern states. The insect emerges in June and July from its larval form into an adult beetle averaging [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Kudzu
by Calton, Brooke. Kudzu (Pueraria lobata), or "kuzu" as it is known in Japan, was introduced to the United States in 1876 as part of the Japanese pavilion at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition. In Japan it is [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
La trucha de agua fresca del estado
by . En el 2003, la Asamblea General adoptó la trucha de arroyo (Salvelinus fontinalis), una raza del sur de las Apalaches, como la trucha de agua fresca del estado de Carolina del Norte (G.S. [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
Largemouth Bass (from NC WINS)
by Dockendorf, Kevin, Jones, Wayne. Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides by Wayne Jones Updated by Kevin Dockendorf, Fisheries Biologist, 2009.N.C. Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Mallard duck (from NC WINS)
by Sawyer, David, Carraway, Mike, Sumner, Perry W., Humphrey, Reed. Mallard Duck Anas platyrhynchos by Perry W. Sumner, David Sawyer, Mike Carraway and Reed Humphrey Updated by Doug HowellNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Marsupial, Virginia Opossom
by Anonymous, Kemp, Amy. State Marsupial of North Carolina: Virginia Opossum By Amy Kemp Government and Heritage Library, 2017 See also: North Carolina State Symbols and Official Adoptions main [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Mink (from NC WINS)
by Olfenbuttel, Colleen, Carraway, Mike, Sumner, Perry W., Pagliughi, Steve. Mink Mustela vison by Perry Sumner, Mike Carraway and Steve Pagliughi Updated by Colleen OlfenbuttelNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Mourning Dove (from NC WINS)
by Threatt-Taylor, Dale, Fuller, Joe, Sharpe, Terry. Mourning Dove Zenaida macroura by Dale Threatt-Taylor and Terry Sharpe updated by Joe FullerNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Mules
by Mills, Jerry Leath. Mules were common features of the North Carolina landscape until the mid-twentieth century. From a census number of 125,608 in 1940, mules have declined so precipitously in the state-beaten out by [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Muskrat (from NC WINS)
by Olfenbuttel, Colleen, Sawyer, David, Carraway, Mike, Sumner, Perry W., Humphrey, Reed. Muskrat Ondatra zibethicus by Perry W. Sumner, David Sawyer, Mike Carraway, Reed Humphrey and Colleen OlfenbuttelNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, June [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Nags Head Woods Ecological Preserve
by Weidman, Rich. Hammocks—unique fertile areas along coastal regions characterized by hardwood vegetation and higher elevations than their surroundings—grew up along the shore of Roanoke Sound and are today protected [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Natural Communities of North Carolina
by Sorrell, Mickey Jo. Natural Communities of North Carolina by Mickey Jo Sorrell, 2014. A natural community is a distinct collection of plants and animals (and fungi and bacteria) associated with each other [...] (from NC Natural Heritage Program, NC Dept. of Environment & Natural Resources.)
Natural History of North-Carolina
by Simpson, Marcus B., Jr. First published in Dublin in 1737, John Brickell's Natural History of North-Carolina was ostensibly written from firsthand observations made by Brickell during his sojourn in North Carolina. The [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Nature Conservancy
by Simpson, Bland. Nature Conservancy by Bland Simpson, 2006 Nature Conservancy, with headquarters in Arlington, Va., is a national organization working for land conservation and the preservation of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Botanical Garden
by White, Peter S. The North Carolina Botanical Garden, a unit of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is a center for the study, display, interpretation, and conservation of plants and the natural areas of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Zoological Park
by Powell, William S. The North Carolina Zoological Park, located in Asheboro, was the first American zoo originally designed to display its animals in situations as close to their natural habitats as possible. Zoos were [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Northern Bobwhite Quail (from NC WINS)
by Wooding, John. Northern Bobwhite Quail Colinus virginianus by John WoodingNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, 2009 Classification Class: Bird Order: [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Opossums
by Dough, Wynne. Opossums (from the Powhatan Indian word aposoun) are the only marsupials indigenous to North Carolina and the United States. Formerly trapped in great numbers for their fur, which was used for [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Osprey (from NC WINS)
by Cameron, Sue, Henson, Tom. Osprey Pandion haliaetus by Tom Henson Update by Susan Cameron, Waterbird Biologist Classification Class: Aves Order: [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Perry, Norman: Redbone Hounds And Wood Pile Dogs
by Cecelski, David S. They call him "Big Norm" in Bertie County. His name is Norman Perry Sr., and he's 82 years old, tough as old leather, and passionate about big swamps, hot-nosed dogs and coon hunting. He has been a [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Pine Bark Beetles
by Smith, Lisa D. Three species of pine bark beetles-ips beetles, black turpentine beetles, and southern pine beetles-destroy significant numbers of North Carolina's extensive pine tree population each year. Of these [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Raccoon (from NC WINS)
by Olfenbuttel, Colleen, Sawyer, David, Pipkin, Kate, Popson, Steve. Raccoon Procyon lotor by Geriann Albers, Colleen Olfenbuttel, Steve Popson, and David Sawyer.North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Ramps
by Tetterton, Beverly. Ramps (Allium tricoccum) are wild leeks or onions found in eastern North America. They grow wild high in the Great Smoky Mountains. Related to the ramson, a kind of garlic with broad leaves, the ramp [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Red Fox (from NC WINS)
by Olfenbuttel, Colleen, Sawyer, David, Sumner, Perry W., Day, Karen A. Red Fox Vulpes vulpes by Geriann Albers, Karen A. Day, Colleen Olfenbuttel, David Sawyer, and Perry SumnerNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, Updated [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Red Wolf (from NC WINS)
by Olfenbuttel, Colleen, Sumner, Perry W., Proctor, Christine, Beyer, Arthur. Red Wolf Canis rufus Written by Arthur Beyer (USFWS), and Perry W. Sumner-NCWRC,and Colleen Olfenbuttel, Black bear and furbearer biologist-NCWRC and Christine Proctor (Virginia [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Red-Shouldered Hawk (from NC WINS)
by Boynton, Allen, Kelly, Christine. Red-shouldered Hawk Buteo lineatus Written by Allen Boynton; updated by Chris Kelly, 2011.North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. Classification Class: [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Roanoke Hogsucker (from NC WINS)
by Fullerton, Aimee H., Nichols, Robert B. Roanoke Hogsucker Hypentelium roanokense by Aimee H. Fullerton, Division of Inland Fisheries Updated by Robert B. Nichols, Aquatic Wildlife Diversity CoordinatorN.C. [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Salamander, Marbled Salamander
by Horton, Emily S., Kemp, Amy. State Salamander of North Carolina: Marbled Salamander by Emily Horton and Amy Kemp NC Government & Heritage Library, 2017 See also: North Carolina State Symbols and Official [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Sea Turtles
by North Carolina Awards Commission. Sea Turtles See also: Terrapins By North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, [...] (from North Carolina Wildlife, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission.)
Shellfish
by Stick, David, Stevenson, George, Carter, Kathy. Shellfish by Kathy Carter, 2006 Additional research provided by George Stevenson and David Stick. See also: Oyster War; Commercial Fishing; Wildlife overview Shellfish is the popular [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Slow Poke the Possum
by Childs, T. Mike. Slow Poke the Possum By T. Mike Childs, 2012, N.C. Government & Heritage Library See also: Heidi the Cross-Eyed Opossum; Possum [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Snipe Hunting
by Mills, Jerry Leath. Snipe Hunting by Jerry Leath Mills, 2006 Snipe hunting in North Carolina denotes one of two forms of recreation. The first, probably the more common, involves a practical joke wherein [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Southern Flying Squirrel (from NC WINS)
by Kelly, Christine, Earley, Lawrence S. Southern Flying Squirrel Glaucomys volans by Lawrence S. Earley Updated by Christine KellyNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Southern Leopard Frog (from NC WINS)
by Beane, Jeff, Godfrey, Matthew. Southern Leopard Frog Rana sphenocephala by Jeff Beane and Matthew GodfreyNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. Classification Class: [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Spanish Moss
by Smith, Lisa D. Spanish Moss by Lisa D. Smith, 2006 Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides) is not actually a moss but rather a member of the pineapple family. Deriving its nutrients from the air, Spanish moss is [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Striped Bass (from NC WINS)
by Striper, John N., McCargo, Jeremy. Striped Bass Morone saxatilis Originally written by John N. Striper, A Story of Fish and Man, (Little, Brown and C., 1978); Re-written by Jeremy McCargo, Fisheries [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Striped Skunk (from NC WINS)
by Olfenbuttel, Colleen, James, Elizabeth T. I. Striped Skunk Mephitis mephitis by Elizabeth T.I. James Updated by Colleen OlfenbuttelNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Tangerine Darter (from NC WINS)
by Watson, Brian T., Fraley, Steve. Tangerine Darter Percina aurantiaca by Brian T. Watson, Division of Inland Fisheries Updated by Steve Fraley, N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission.North Carolina Wildlife [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Terrapins
by Stick, David. Terrapins, members of the tortoise order, are similar in appearance to many of the most common types of turtles. Best known of the North Carolina terrapins are the diamondbacks (Malaclemys terrapin), [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Travels of William Bartram
by Powell, William S. Travels of William Bartram is the familiar title by which the 522-page volume by naturalist William Bartram (1739-1823) is generally referred. The work documents his four-year journey through large [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Virginia Big-Eared Bat (from NC WINS)
by Boynton, Allen. Virginia Big-Eared Bat Corynorhinus townsendii by Allen Boynton, Katherine Caldwell, Phil Spivey, and Joey WebeNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, Updated [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Walleye (from NC WINS)
by Goudreau, Christopher J., Yow, David L., Brown, Robert J. Walleye Sander vitreus by Robert J. Brown and Christopher J. Goudreau Updated by David L. Yow, marine biologistNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission See [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Waterfowl
by Stick, David, Foote, Margaret. Ducks, geese, swans, and other waterfowl have played a prominent role in the lives of many North Carolinians, especially those living in the vicinity of the coastal sounds. These birds all breed in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
White Squirrels
by Kemp, Amy. According to local legend, Brevard’s famed white squirrel population can trace their lineage back to a single pair of white squirrels that arrived in the town when a carnival animal truck overturned [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
White-tailed Deer (from NC WINS)
by Hartigan, Chris, Stanford, Evin, Osborne, Scott. White-tailed Deer Odocoileus virginianus by Chris Hartigan, Scott Osborne, Jonathan Shaw, and Evin StanfordNorth Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, Updated [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Wild Boar (from NC WINS)
by Stanford, Evin, Sheaton, Julie, Jones, Mark D. Wild Boar Sus scrofa by Julie Sheaton Excerpts from “Hog Wild” by Mark Jones, Wildlife in North Carolina, Feb. 2006. Updated by Evin StanfordNorth Carolina [...] (from NC Wildlife Information Network Share (NC WINS).)
Wild Horses
by Dough, Wynne. Celebrated "wild ponies," actually stunted feral horses, ran loose over much of the Outer Banks until the late 1930s, when the General Assembly abolished free range north of Hatteras Inlet. Five [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wildflowers
by Powell, William S., Foote, Margaret. North Carolina's wildflowers have long been recognized as one of the state's most treasured resources. Native Americans and early settlers valued wildflowers as sources of food and medicine, while [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wildlife overview
by Hairr, John, Harris, William C., Freeman, Joan E., Mills, Jerry Leath, Templeton, Lee Plummer, Snow, Jean, Wait, Douglas A., Carter, KathySmith, Clyde. Wildlife overview by Lee Plummer Templeton and Douglas A. Wait, 2006 Additional research provided by Larkin Bell, Kathy Carter, Evan L. Erickson, Joan E. Freeman, John Hairr, William C. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wildlife: Birds
by Templeton, Lee Plummer, Wait, Douglas A. Wildlife: Birds by Lee Plummer Templeton and Douglas A. Wait, 2006 Additional research provided by Larkin Bell, Kathy Carter, Evan L. Erickson, Joan E. Freeman, John Hairr, William C. Harris, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wildlife: Fish
by Templeton, Lee Plummer, Wait, Douglas A. Wildlife: Fish by Lee Plummer Templeton and Douglas A. Wait, 2006 Additional research provided by Larkin Bell, Kathy Carter, Evan L. Erickson, Joan E. Freeman, John Hairr, William C. Harris, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wildlife: Mammals
by Templeton, Lee Plummer, Wait, Douglas A. Wildlife: Mammals by Lee Plummer Templeton and Douglas A. Wait, 2006 Additional research provided by Larkin Bell, Kathy Carter, Evan L. Erickson, Joan E. Freeman, John Hairr, William C. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wildlife: Reptiles and amphibians
by Templeton, Lee Plummer, Wait, Douglas A. Wildlife: Reptiles and amphibians by Lee Plummer Templeton and Douglas A. Wait, 2006 Additional research provided by Larkin Bell, Kathy Carter, Evan L. Erickson, Joan E. Freeman, John Hairr, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Woolly Worm
by Patteson, Angelyn H. The fuzzy brown and black creature commonly called the woolly worm or woolly bear is the larval form of the tiger moth (Isia isabella). Woolly worms appear in early fall, when they feast on common [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
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