Medicine

Medicine
Adams-Ender, Clara
by Pollitt, Phoebe Ann. Originally published in "North Carolina Nursing History." Republished with permission. For personal educational use and not for further distribution. Please submit permission requests for other uses [...] (from Appalachian State University.)
Amputations in the Civil War
by Wegner, Ansley Herring. Amputations in the Civil War Originally published as "When Johnny Couldn't Come Marching Home: Civil War Amputations" by Ansley Herring Wegner Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Babies Hospital
by Hill, Michael. Babies Hospital by Michael Hill, 2006 The Babies Hospital was a seaside pediatric institution that operated in New Hanover County from [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bell, Martha McFarlane
by Suggs, Joseph R. Martha McFarlane McGee, one of the heroines of the American Revolution, was born in Orange County. No positive record of her parents' names has been located, but her maiden name indicates that she [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Black Tongue
by Joyner, Whitmel M. Black Tongue is the familiar name for the often fatal effects of a deficiency of the vitamin niacin (once designated Vitamin B3, now B5), found chiefly in liver, lean meat, poultry, fish, and beans. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Broadfoot, Carrie Early
by Pollitt, Phoebe Ann. Originally published in "North Carolina Nursing History." Republished with permission. For personal educational use and not for further distribution. Please submit permission requests for other uses [...] (from Appalachian State University.)
Brown, Hattie: A Freedom Story
by Cecelski, David S. I spoke with Hattie Brown as we walked through the old graveyard in Goshen, a black farming community in Jones County. She had a story for each of the dead. Her most striking memories were her [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Burroughs Wellcome Fund
by Moore, Cecelia. Burroughs Wellcome Fund (BWF) is an independent private foundation whose mission is to advance the medical sciences by supporting research and other scientific and educational activities. It was [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Confederate Laboratory
by Barefoot, Daniel W. The Confederate laboratory, located two miles south of Lincolnton in Lincoln County, was one of at least five laboratories established by the Confederate States of America to manufacture drugs from [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Council, Commodore Thomas, Sr.
by Green, C. Sylvester. Commodore Thomas Council, Sr., pharmaceutical manufacturer, churchman, and civic leader, the son of John Lawrence and Glendora Burgess Council, was born in rural Chatham County. He went first to the [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Crazy Water Crystals
by Williams, Wiley J. Crazy Water Crystals, a laxative made by the Crazy Water Crystals Company of Mineral Wells, Tex., became known to many rural and working-class North Carolinians during the Great Depression through [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Crossnore School
by Coonin, Bryna R. The Crossnore School, a nondenominational Christian home for children located in the town of Crossnore in the Linville Valley of Avery County, was founded by two doctors, Mary Martin Sloop, of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Dentistry
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Dentistry, like medicine, has changed dramatically throughout history. From colonial times through the first decades of the nineteenth century, dental procedures were merely an additional service [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Dimock, Susan
by Worthy, Pauline. Dimock, Susan By Pauline Worthy, 1986 24 Apr. 1847–8 May 1875 Susan Dimrock, North Carolina's first woman doctor, was born in Washington, N.C., to Henry Dimock and his wife, Mary Malvina [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Dixon-Carroll, Elizabeth Delia
by Wells, Warner. Elizabeth Delia Dixon-Carroll, physician and director of medical services, professor of physiology and hygiene, and infirmary physician of Meredith College, Raleigh, was born in Shelby of English and [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Drugstores
by Norris, David A. Drugstores, or apothecary shops, were scarce in eighteenth-century North Carolina. Solomon Halling and Henry Tooley advertised their New Bern shops in the North-Carolina Gazette in 1784 and 1793, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Durham, Carl Thomas
by Wells, Warner. Durham, Carl Thomas by Warner Wells, 1986 28 Aug. 1892–29 Apr. [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ginseng Trade
by Wegner, Ansley Herring. Ginseng is a hardy perennial that proliferates along the biodiverse forest floors in the Appalachian Mountains. The root of the ginseng plant was so highly prized in China for its medicinal uses that [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Gloyne, Lula Owl
by . Originally published in Courageous Care:  African American and Cherokee Nurses in Appalachia 1900-1965. Republished with permission. For personal educational use and not for further distribution. [...] (from Appalachian State University.)
Grove, Edwin Wiley
by Powell, William S. Edwin Wiley Grove, proprietary drug manufacturer and Asheville developer, was born in Whiteville, Hardeman County, Tenn., the son of James Henry and Mary Jane Harris Grove. Both of his parents were [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Guion, Connie Myers
by Putzel, Rosamond. Connie Myers Guion, physician and teacher, was born at River Bend Plantation near Lincolnton. Her parents, Benjamin Simmons and Catherine Coatesworth Caldwell Guion, moved the family to Charlotte [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Haywood, Edmund Burke
by Haywood, Marshall De Lancey. Edmund Burke Haywood, physician, Confederate surgeon, and medical administrator, was born in Raleigh, the youngest son of Eliza Eagles Asaph Williams and John Haywood, state treasurer. He was a [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Headache Powders
by Cherry, Kevin. Headache powders, usually mixtures of aspirin and caffeine, are a form of pain reliever extremely popular in North Carolina and other southern states. Local pharmacists originally concocted their own [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Herbs
by Middlesworth, Chester Paul. Herbs and their use as medicines date back to the earliest recorded history of the region that became North Carolina. Native Americans, under the direction of tribal medicine men, established many [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hicks, Ellen Thompson
by Sims, Anastatia. Ellen Thompson Hicks, nurse and Episcopal missionary, was born in Oxford, the daughter of Edward Hubbell and Harriet Virginia Britton Hicks. Her father, a lawyer and a graduate of The University of [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Holland, Annie Wealthy
by Shaber, Sarah R. Annie Wealthy Holland, educator, was born in Isle of Wight County, Va., on a plot of land contiguous to the Wealthy plantation, where her grandmother had been a slave. She was the daughter of John [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hospitals
by Mitchell, Memory F., Anthony, Robert G., Jr., Causey, Ellen Fitzgibbons, Lillard, Stewart, Bumgarner, Sheila, Taylor, Margaret, Goloboy, Maggie. Well into the twentieth century, sick or injured North Carolinians were cared for primarily at home. In colonial times ill persons without families were looked after in almshouses. As contagious [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Infectious Diseases- Part I: Overview
by Parramore, Thomas C., Norris, David A., Cockrell, David L., Joyner, William S., Hosfeld, Andrew. Before the widespread distribution of vaccinations, many serious, often deadly contagious diseases were commonplace in North Carolina and other American colonies and states. The Carolina colony [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Jackson, Della Hayden Raney
by Pollitt, Phoebe Ann. Originally published in "North Carolina Nursing History." Republished with permission. For personal educational use and not for further distribution. Please submit permission requests for other uses [...] (from Appalachian State University.)
Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust
by Moore, Cecelia. The Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust is a philanthropic foundation created in 1947 and based in Winston-Salem. By virtue of the intent of its donor, the trust is dedicated to improving health care [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Keeley Institute
by Stoesen, Alexander R. The Keeley Institute was incorporated in September 1891 and opened the next month in the Central Hotel Building at Elm and Market Streets in the center of Greensboro. It was reincorporated on 20 Mar. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Kidney Stone Belt
by Rains, Rusty. The Kidney Stone Belt refers to the region in the southeastern United States where the rate of kidney stones, or kidney calculi, is excessive. North Carolina reportedly has the highest incidence of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings
by Williams, Wiley J. Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings (LabCorp), with headquarters in Burlington and facilities in Charlotte and Research Triangle Park, is one of the world's largest clinical laboratory [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
London, Arthur Hill, Jr.
by Green, C. Sylvester. London, Arthur Hill, Jr. by C. Sylvester Green, 1991 5 July 1903–24 Apr. 1976 Arthur Hill London, Jr., pediatrician and medical educator, was born in Pittsboro, the son of Arthur Hill, Sr., [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Madstones
by Anderson, Jean B. Madstones have existed from antiquity in the realms of magic and have appeared at various times in North Carolina folklore. Akin to precious and semiprecious stones, to which fortune or healing were [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mallett, William Peter
by Snow, Claude H., Jr. William Peter Mallett, physician, pioneer surgeon, and benefactor of The University of North Carolina, was born in Fayetteville, the second son of Charles Mallett, who, along with his three Huguenot [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mason, Martha
by Agan, Kelly. On September 13, 1948, eleven year old Martha Mason of Lattimore, N.C. came down with polio on the very day her parents buried her older brother Gaston who had succumbed to the disease days before. [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
McDougall, William
by Mauskopf, Seymour H. McDougall, William by Seymour H. Mauskopf, 1991 22 June 1871–28 Nov. 1938 William McDougall, psychologist, was born in Lancashire, England, the son of Rebekah Smalley and Isaac Shimwell [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mebane, Benjamin Franklin
by Powell, William S. Benjamin Franklin Mebane, physician and manufacturer of a widely used patent medicine, was born at Mason Hall in the part of Orange County that became Alamance County in 1849, the son of George Allen [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Medical Board
by Williams, Wiley J. The modern North Carolina Medical Board (NCMB) began as the North Carolina State Board of Medical Examiners, created by the General Assembly in 1859 "in order to properly regulate the practice of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Medical Education - History
by Roberson, Francine Mary Netter. From apprenticeship to a rigorous standardized course of study, medical instruction in North Carolina has progressed step by step over the last 200 years.  The education of physicians and surgeons [...] (from NCpedia.)
Medical Schools
by Powell, William S., Johnson, K. Todd, Wright, Marilyn. Medical education for North Carolinians who desired to become physicians in the eighteenth or nineteenth century was generally obtained through a program of apprenticeship. In the absence of formal [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Medical Society
by Hatcher, Susan Tucker. The North Carolina Medical Society was founded in 1849 "to unite, serve, and represent physicians, in order to enhance physician advocacy for their patients, and improve the health of the people of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Medicine Shows
by Menius, Arthur. Medicine Shows by Arthur Menius, 2006 See also: Crazy Water Crystals; Patent Medicines; Country Music Medicine shows, from roughly the end of the Civil [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mental Retardation Centers
by Williams, Wiley J. North Carolina has five state-run facilities under the control of the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services for mentally handicapped residents. The [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Milk Sickness
by Wood, Curtis W. Milk sickness, also called "milk sick fever" and "sick stomach," is caused by the excretion of tremetol or tremetone, the toxin in white snakeroot and rayless goldenrod, when these common plants are [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Miracle of Hickory
by Zuber, Richard L. The "Miracle of Hickory" refers to an emergency hospital established in Hickory during the summer of 1944 to treat infantile paralysis (polio). The descriptive name comes from the title of a pamphlet [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Nursing Education in North Carolina: Overview
by Pollitt, Phoebe Ann. Originally published in "North Carolina Nursing History." Republished with permission. For personal educational use and not for further distribution. Please submit permission requests for other uses [...] (from Appalachian State University.)
Patent Medicines
by Kobrin, Lisa Brantley. Patent Medicines by Lisa Brantley Kobrin, 2006 See also: Medicine Shows; Crazy Water Crystals Patent medicines were proprietary drugs, often containing alcohol, narcotics, or [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Penland, Anne
by Bandel, Jessica. Asheville native Anne Penland graduated from the nursing program at Presbyterian Hospital in New York in 1912 and went on to complete advanced training in anesthesiology. Shortly after [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Perry, Alice Threatt
by Percival, Perry. Alice Threatt Perry, pioneer registered nurse in North Carolina, Spanish-American War veteran, commander of the North Carolina Department of United Spanish War Veterans, and trustee of Wingate [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Person, Alice Morgan
by Hill, Michael. Alice Morgan Person, businesswoman and medicine show performer, was born in Petersburg, Va., the daughter of Samuel and Esther Morgan. In December 1857 she married Joseph Arrington Person and moved [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Psychiatric Hospitals
by Anthony, Robert G., Jr., Homrighaus, Ruth E., Montgomery, J. Field, Jr. By the early 2000s the North Carolina Division of Mental Health, Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services operated four psychiatric hospitals for care of the mentally ill, each serving a specific [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Red Cross
by Dysart, John B. The American Red Cross, a nonprofit humanitarian organization dedicated to helping citizens prepare for and respond to large-scale emergencies, was formed in 1881, modeled on humanitarian work by [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Resorts- Part 2: Resorts of Western North Carolina
by Stick, David, Starnes, Richard D., Fick, William G., Jr. Resorts by Virginia Gunn Fick and Richard D. Starnes, 2006 Additional research provided by David Stick. See also: Andrews Geyser; Carolina Hotel; Grove Park Inn; Hot Springs; Outer [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Rice Diet
by McVaugh, Michael R. In 1939 Walter Kempner of the Duke University Medical Center in Durham began to prescribe a short-term diet based almost entirely on rice-high in fiber, low in protein and fat, and salt-free-to [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Richardson II, Lunsford (from Tar Heel Junior Historian)
by Hinds-Brown, Lindsey. Lunsford Richardson II Inventor of Vicks VapoRub by Lindsey Hinds-­Brown Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian, Fall 2006. Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, NC [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Richardson, Lunsford
by Preyer, Norris W. Lunsford Richardson, pharmacist and founder of the Vick Chemical Company, grew up on a plantation in Johnston County southeast of Raleigh. His father, Lunsford Richardson, Sr., died before he was [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Root Doctors
by Beck, John J. Root doctors are the traditional healers and conjurers of the rural, black South. They use herbs, roots, potions, and spells to help and sometimes to hurt recipients of their ministrations. Root [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Slade, James: People That Do Right
by Cecelski, David S. Dr. James Slade is the sort of impossibly old-fashioned doctor who still makes house calls and has never thought about joining an HMO. For 35 years he has been practicing pediatrics and general [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Sloop, Mary T. Martin
by Inscoe, John C. Mary T. Martin Sloop, physician, educator, and reformer, was born in Davidson, where her father, William Joseph Martin, was a professor of geology and chemistry at Davidson College. Her mother was [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Stanback, Thomas Melville
by Powell, William S. Thomas Melville Stanback, pharmacist, was born in Byhalia, Miss., the son of Charles and Della Ingram Stanback. His parents had moved from Richmond County, N.C., a few years before his birth and [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Trent, Josiah Charles
by Gifford, James F. Josiah Charles Trent, surgeon and historian of medicine, was born in Okmulgee, Okla., the youngest of four children, to parents of English ancestry. His father, Josiah Charles Trent, was a native of [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Vick Chemical Company
by Preyer, Norris W. The Vick Chemical Company began as a small cold remedy company in Greensboro and grew into a diversified Fortune 500 corporation with sales in more than 160 countries around the world. In 1905 [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Williamson, James Edwards
by Reed, Andrew. Dr. James Edwards Williamson was a physician and well-known politician in Caswell County, North Carolina. Born August 13, 1799 in Caswell County, Dr. Williamson was a graduate of the University of [...] (from NCpedia.)
WWI: Medicine on the battlefield
by Campbell, John. From a medical standpoint, World War I was a miserable and bloody affair. In less than a year the American armed forces suffered more than 318,000 casualties, of which 120,000 were deaths. Almost [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
WWI: North Carolina and Influenza
by Belton, Tom. WWI: North Carolina and Influenza by Tom Belton Reprinted with permission from Tar Heel Junior Historian, Spring 1993. Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, NC Museum of History See [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Wyche, Mary Lewis
by Powell, William S. Mary Lewis Wyche, nurse, was born near Williamsboro in present Vance County, the daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Hunter Wyche. In 1889 she was graduated from Henderson College, where she had taught in [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
X-Ray Experiments
by Horton, Clarence E., Jr. X-Ray Experiments by Clarence E. Horton Jr., 2006 On 8 Nov. 1895 Professor Wilhelm Roentgen of the University of Würzburg, Germany, accidentally discovered that electricity, when passed [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
X-Rays: Discovering a Super Power
by . Have you even injured yourself and needed to have an X-ray? Or maybe you’ve had x-rays taken of your teeth at the dentist. Doctors use x-rays to take pictures of things inside our bodies to help [...] (from NCpedia K-8 Collection.)
Young, David Alexander
by Powell, William S. David Alexander Young, psychiatrist and hospital administrator, was born in Raleigh, the son of James Richard and Virginia Nicholls Young. His father, of Vance County, was North Carolina's first [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Young, Richard Knox
by Powell, William S. Richard Knox Young, clergyman and pioneer in pastoral care for the ill, was born on a farm in Person County, the son of Ernest Moore and Ethel Pugh Young. He became ill as an infant, and the family [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
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