Ships

Ships
Advance
by Harris, William C. Advance by William C. Harris, 2006 See also: Modern Greece Advance was the first and most famous of four blockade-running vessels that the state of North Carolina operated in partnership [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Albemarle, CSS
by Blair, Dan. The CSS Albemarle, an ironclad ram, was one of the Confederacy's most successful ironclads. This vessel and its sister ship, the CSS Neuse, were designed to wrest control of North Carolina's sounds [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Archaeology Part 4: Underwater Archaeology
by Freeman, Joan E., Davis, R. P. Stephen, Jr., Lawrence, Richard W. Archaeology by Joan E. Freeman and R. P. Stephen Davis Jr., 2006. Additional research provided by Richard W. Lawrence. Part 1: Archaeological Research in the Coastal Plain; Part 2: [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Asheville, USS
by Holland, Ron, Ashe, Walter. The city of Asheville had four naval warships named in its honor during the twentieth century. The USS Asheville (PG-21) was the first warship built at the Charleston Naval Shipyard in Charleston, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ballast Stones
by Powell, William S. Ballast stones, whose weight stabilized empty ships, have been found at various colonial landing sites along the North Carolina coast. Although there are no known records, residents and local [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Battleships Bombed by Billy Mitchell
by Branch, Paul. Battleships Bombed by Billy Mitchell by Paul Branch, 2006 See also: Graveyard of the Atlantic In 1923 two surplus navy battleships were bombed and sunk by aircraft under the command of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Blossom's Ferry
by Tetterton, Beverly. Blossom's Ferry was located on the Northeast Cape Fear River on the border between New Hanover and Pender Counties, one mile east-northeast of the community of Castle Hayne and approximately nine [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
British Cemetery
by Branch, Paul. The British Cemetery on Ocracoke Island is a small cemetery containing the graves of four British navy personnel killed while helping defend the North Carolina coast against German U-boats [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cassidey's Shipyard
by Steelman, Bennett L. Cassidey's Shipyard was the smaller of two Confederate shipyards in Wilmington during the Civil War and the construction site of the ironclad CSS Raleigh. The yard was founded when James Cassidey [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Charlotte Navy Yard
by Blair, Dan. Charlotte became one of the Confederate navy's most important manufacturing centers during the Civil War. The incongruity of a landlocked city housing a navy yard is explained by its location in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cooke, James Wallace
by Butler, Lindley S. James Wallace Cooke, Confederate naval officer and commander of the ironclad C.S.S. Albemarle, was born in Beaufort to Thomas and Esther Cooke. He was orphaned at the age of four years, and he and [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
El barco histórico del estado
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
Elizabeth II
by Latham, David W. The Elizabeth II, a historic attraction on Roanoke Island, is a 69-foot, square-rigged sailing ship representative of the Elizabethan vessels used to carry the first English colonists to the New [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Elliott, Gilbert
by Elliott, Robert G. Gilbert Elliott, Confederate officer and builder of the Confederate ram, Albemarle, lawyer, and law directory publisher, was born in Elizabeth City, the third child of Gilbert Elliott (20 May 1813–20 [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ellis, Richard
by Carraway, Gertrude S. Richard Ellis, Revolutionary War patriot and shipowner, was a native of Ireland living in New Bern prior to 1765. On 16 May of that year he was one of the forty residents requesting Governor William [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ferries
by Stick, David. Ferries are an integral part of North Carolina's modern transportation system, with 24 ferries providing regularly scheduled runs on seven different routes across rivers, sounds, and even an ocean [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fortuna
by Fish, Peter Graham. The Fortuna case, decided by U.S. Supreme Court chief justice John Marshall in the U.S. Circuit Court for the District of North Carolina on an appeal from Judge Henry Potter's district court, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Graveyard of the Atlantic
by Stick, David. Graveyard of the Atlantic by David Stick, 2006 See also: Huron, USS; Mirlo Rescue; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Harkers Island Boats
by Babits, Lawrence E. Harkers Island Boats by Lawrence E. Babits, 2006 See also: North Carolina Shipbuilding Company (from Tar Heel Junior Historian); [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Huron, USS
by Carter, Kathy. Huron, USS by Kathy Carter, 2006 The USS Huron remains one of the most famous shipwrecks in North Carolina's "Graveyard of the Atlantic." A man-of-war steamer, the Huron ran aground off [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Liberty Ships
by Fowlkes, Jim. Liberty Ships by Jim Fowlkes, 2006 See also: Zebulon B. Vance, USS; North Carolina Shipbuilding Company (from Tar Heel Junior Historian); Shipbuilding Liberty ships, a number of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Lifesaving Service, U.S
by Carter, Kathy. Lifesaving Service, U.S by Kathy Carter, 2006 See also: Mirlo Rescue; Huron, USS Established as a federal agency in 1872 and operating in North Carolina by 1874, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Lightships
by Carr, Dawson V. Lightships by Dawson V. Carr, 2006 See also: Lighthouses; Lighthouses Map; Lighthouses Lightships, beginning in the early nineteenth century, were anchored off the North Carolina coast to alert [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mirlo Rescue
by Stick, David, Carter, Kathy. Mirlo Rescue by David Stick and Kathy Carter, 2006 See also: Shipwrecks; Huron, USS; Lifesaving Service, U.S The Mirlo rescue, conducted by the Chicamacomico Coast Guard Station (originally [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Modern Greece
by Bright, Leslie S. Modern Greece by Leslie S. Bright, 2006 See also: Advance Modern Greece was a screw steam freighter used as [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Monitor, USS
by Blair, Dan. The USS Monitor, lying in 230 feet of water off Cape Hatteras, is probably the most famous victim of the infamous "Graveyard of the Atlantic" off the North Carolina coast. The Monitor was the third [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mosquito Fleet
by Barrett, John G. The Mosquito Fleet was the whimsical nickname for the four small steamers that comprised the North Carolina Navy at the beginning of the Civil War. The ships were under orders not only to defend [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mothball Fleet
by Tetterton, Beverly. The Mothball Fleet, the nickname for the U.S. Maritime Commission's reserve fleet, was located on the Brunswick River across from the city of Wilmington. Following World War II, Congress made the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Neuse, CSS
by Bright, Leslie S. In October 1862 the Confederate navy commissioned the building of the ironclad gunboat CSS Neuse to strengthen southern defenses and prevent Union occupation of the sounds and rivers of North [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Shipbuilding Company (from Tar Heel Junior Historian)
by Scott, Ralph. North Carolina Shipbuilding Company "Wilmington Helps Weld an Allied Victory" by Ralph Scott Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian. Spring 2008. Tar Heel Junior [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
North Carolina, CSS
by Combs, Edwin L. The CSS North Carolina was a steam-powered ironclad ram, one of two Richmond-class ironclads built for the Confederate navy in Wilmington during the Civil War. Six Richmond-class ships were laid down [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina, USS
by Stinson, Craig M. When commissioned at the New York Naval Shipyard on 9 Apr. 1941, the USS North Carolina was considered the "greatest sea weapon in the world." Built at a cost of $70 million, the new [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Oyster War
by Stevenson, George. In 1891 North Carolina declared "war" on the oyster fishermen who had drifted down from the north. By the 1880s overfishing had dangerously depleted the seemingly inexhaustible oyster beds of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pennsylvania Farmer
by Norris, David A. The Pennsylvania Farmer was the most well known of three vessels obtained for the North Carolina Navy in early 1776 for service in the American Revolution. The North Carolina Provincial Council, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Periauger
by Babits, Lawrence E. A periauger was a wooden boat created by digging out a log, then splitting it longitudinally and adding at least one keel plank between the halves. The keel plank improved stability and increased [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Picket, USS
by Branch, Paul. The USS Picket was a small Union gunboat that fought during the Civil War in the sounds and rivers of North Carolina until September 1862, when it was sunk in the Tar River at Washington, N.C. The [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pirates
by Stick, David. Pirates who frequented coastal North Carolina during the early colonial period were involved in enough nefarious activities to emerge as the subjects of at least a dozen books and numerous articles [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Privateers
by Stick, David. Privateers were privately owned and manned ships authorized by their governments during wartime to attack and capture enemy shipping vessels. Documents called "letters of marque" officially spelled [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Revenue Cutter Service
by Tetterton, Beverly. The Revenue Cutter Service, which employed federal cutters to enforce maritime laws, was established in 1790 to collect much-needed revenue for a post-Revolutionary War U.S. Treasury and to terminate [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ropewalks
by Stevenson, George. Ropewalks were sites where hemp fiber was spun into yarn and then twine, cord, and rope of various dimensions. The name derived from the fact that production required the artisan, called the spinner, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Sellers, Isaiah
by Miller, Randall M. Isaiah Sellers, Mississippi River pilot, was born in Iredell County but for unknown reasons departed for the West as a young man. Sometime during the early 1820s he reached the Mississippi River, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Sharpies
by Babits, Lawrence E. Sharpies by Lawrence E. Babits, 2006 Sharpies were late-nineteenth-century workboats that, according to tradition, were introduced into North Carolina from Long Island Sound by George Ives [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Shipbuilding
by Stick, David, Fontenoy, Paul E. Shipbuilding by David Stick and Paul E. Fontenoy, 2006 See also: Harkers Island Boats; Ironclads; Liberty Ships; North Carolina Shipbuilding Company (from Tar Heel Junior [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Shipwrecks
by Stick, David. Shipwrecks by David Stick, 2006 See also: Graveyard of the Atlantic; Huron, USS; Lifesaving Service, U.S. Shipwrecks in past centuries were so prevalent along the North Carolina [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Snap Dragon
by Nash, Jaquelin Drane. The Snap Dragon was the most successful North Carolina privateer in combat with the British fleet in the War of 1812. The schooner was built on the West River in Maryland in 1808 and originally named [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Sparrow, Thomas, II
by Sparrow, W. Keats. Thomas Sparrow, II, shipbuilder, was born at Smith's Creek, Craven County, the son of Thomas, I (1751–1822), and his first wife, Theresa (Rhesa) Delamar Sparrow. Sparrow's career in building [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Steamboats
by Barfield, Rodney D., Norris, David A. Steamboats by Rodney D. Barfield and David A. Norris, 2006 See also: Dan River Steam Navigation Company; French Broad Steamboat Company; In North Carolina, the concept of travel by [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Submarine Attacks
by Branch, Paul, Barefoot, Daniel W. Submarine Attacks by Paul Branch and Daniel W. Barefoot, 2006 See also: Coast Guard, U.S.; Mirlo Rescue; U-Boats off the Outer Banks; The Allan Jackson:  First North Carolina Coastal [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Underwriter, USS
by Branch, Paul. The USS Underwriter, a navy gunboat, fought in the sounds and rivers of North Carolina during the Civil War. Early in 1864 the Underwriter was in the Neuse River at New Bern when Confederate forces [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Waddell, James Iredell
by Chambers, E. M. Waddell, James Iredell by E. M. Chambers, 1996 13 July 1824–15 Mar. 1886 James Iredell Waddell, captain of the Confederate cruiser Shenandoah, was born in Pittsboro, Chatham County, the son [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wasp
by Cross, Jerry L. The Wasp was a privateer commanded by Capt. Johnston Blakeley during the War of 1812. The sloop was still under construction at Newburyport, Mass., when Blakeley received his appointment on 13 Aug. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wilmington, CSS
by Combs, Edwin L. The CSS Wilmington was the last of three ironclad warships built by the Confederate navy in Wilmington during the Civil War. Work began on the CSS Raleigh and CSS North Carolina in the spring of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Zebulon B. Vance, USS
by Warren, Harry S. The USS Zebulon B. Vance was launched in Wilmington on 6 Dec. 1941, one day before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. At the ceremony, North Carolina governor J. Melville Broughton proclaimed, "As [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
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