Schools (K-12)

Schools (K-12)
Adkin High School Walkout (1951) 
by . Adkin High School Walkout 1951  Kinston, NC by the North Carolina Arts Council.  Originally published in African American Music Trails of Eastern North Carolina, copyright [...] (from North Carolina Arts Council.)
Advancement School
by Kuhl, Paul E. The North Carolina Advancement School in Winston-Salem was one of the education initiatives of Governor Terry Sanford (1961-65), who conceived it as a counterpart to the Gifted and Talented Programs [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Appalachian Industrial School
by Williams, Wiley J. The Appalachian Industrial School was a coed grammar school founded in Penland in 1912 by Episcopal minister Rufus Morgan. Sponsored by the Diocese of Western North Carolina of the Episcopal Church, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Asheville Normal and Collegiate Institute
by Wright, Ann S. Asheville Normal and Collegiate Institute was an outgrowth of the Home Industrial School, an elementary school started in 1887 by Louis M. Pease and his wife. The Peases directed the school, and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Asheville School
by Pruden, William H., III. Asheville School by William H. Pruden III, 2006 See also: Private [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Atlantic Collegiate Institute
by Williams, Wiley J. In 1878 Samuel Lloyd Sheep, a Pennsylvanian who had recently arrived in Elizabeth City, opened the Elizabeth City Academy. The history of the academy in its earliest years is unknown, but records [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bennett College
by Wadelington, Charles W. Bennett College, in Greensboro, began in 1873 as a coeducational academy for African American youth. The school was founded through the motivation of newly freed slaves, but the Freedman's Aid and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Caldwell Institute
by Cross, Jerry L. The Caldwell Institute, originally located in Guilford County, grew out of the determined effort of the Presbyterian Church to establish a school providing a classical education imbued with Christian [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Caldwell School
by Stoesen, Alexander R. Caldwell School by Alexander R. Stoesen, 2006 See also: Private Education The David Caldwell School, also known as "Log College," was established in what is now Greensboro in 1767 [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Carolina Christian College
by Hill, Michael. Carolina Christian College, a precursor of present-day Barton College in Wilson, was established by the Disciples of Christ in 1893 in the Pitt County town of Ayden, where it operated until 1903. By [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Charlotte Country Day School
by Rankin, Richard. Charlotte Country Day School, the oldest independent school in Mecklenburg County, was founded in 1941. The school began with 18 students in the preschool through sixth grades and met in the home of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Chowan University
by Martin, James I., Sr. Chowan College, a four-year institution affiliated with the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, is located in Murfreesboro in the northeastern part of the state. The college traces its [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Clio's Nursery
by Troxler, George W. Clio's Nursery, established by pioneer Presbyterian minister James Hall, was a successful eighteenth-century classical academy located in what is now east-central Iredell County, about ten miles [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cokesbury School
by Wall, James W. The Cokesbury School, the first Methodist-sponsored school in North Carolina, was built near Aquila Phelps's horse ford on the Yadkin River in eastern Rowan (now Davie) County in about 1790. It was [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Concordia College
by Williams, Wiley J. Concordia College by Wiley J. Williams, 2006 Concordia College was established in Conover in 1877 as Concordia High School by the Lutherans of the Tennessee Synod. It was converted into a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Crowfield Academy
by Hill, Michael. Crowfield Academy, a classical school in what is today Iredell County, was operated by Presbyterians from about 1760 to 1788. Although the school trained many prominent men, records pertaining to its [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Durham Academy
by Anderson, Jean B. Durham Academy, a private, independent day school in Durham, was begun in 1933 by Mrs. George Watts Hill for the education of her children and the children of her friends. The school initially [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Elise Academy and High School
by Remsburg, Robert L., III. Elise Academy and High School was located in northern Moore County in what became the town of Robbins. Lacking funds, Moore County was unable to build a high school in the area in the 1890s. Local [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Farm-Life Schools
by Jones, H. G. The establishment of high schools early in the twentieth century, though an important educational advance, benefited only a small fraction of North Carolina's school-age children-most of whom lived [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fassifern School
by Barefoot, Daniel W. The Fassifern School, a noted preparatory school for girls, was established in Lincolnton in 1907 by Catherine Cameron Shipp, the daughter of state attorney general William Marcus Shipp. From 1898 to [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fayetteville Academy
by Howard, Jeffrey Allen. Fayetteville Academy by Jeffrey Allen Howard, 2006 Fayetteville Academy was chartered in 1791 and incorporated in 1799. The school, the first in Fayetteville, was headed by Presbyterian [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Germanton Academy
by Otterbourg, Ken. Germanton Academy was established in 1810 as a private school in Germanton, the county seat of what was then Stokes County. (In 1849 the county was divided and the southern part became Forsyth [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Goldsboro Female College
by Hake, Rachel, Ellis, Charles B. Goldsboro Female College See Also: North Carolina Women's Colleges by Rachel Hake and Charles B. Ellis, 2006 Goldsboro Female College began in 1854 as Wayne Female College in Goldsboro. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Governor's School of North Carolina
by Cherry, Kevin. The Governor's School of North Carolina is the nation's oldest statewide residential summer program for academically gifted high school students. Founded in 1963 at the urging of Governor Terry [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
High Point Female College
by McCaslin, Richard B. High Point Female College operated under a charter from the North Carolina legislature as a joint-stock enterprise from March 1889, when it relocated to High Point from Thomasville at mid-term, until [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hillsborough Academy
by Anderson, Jean B. Hillsborough Academy by Jean B. Anderson, 2006 See also: Bingham School. Hillsborough Academy was the name given various schools established by prominent citizens of the town of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Horner School
by Anderson, Jean B. The Horner School, Horner and Graves's School, and Horner Military Academy were a few of the names given to the secondary school established by James Hunter Horner and his family members over the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Joseph Keasbey Brick Agricultural, Industrial, and Normal School (Brick School)
by Cross, Jerry L. Joseph Keasbey Brick Agricultural, Industrial, and Normal School (Brick School): 1895-1933 By Jerry Cross, 1979 Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History, [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Judson College
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Judson College was a nineteenth-century academy located in the mountain town of Hendersonville. The school was conceived by the Western Carolina Baptist Association in 1858 and originally named the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Kinston College
by Taylor, Charles E. Kinston College, a private coeducational college preparatory school, began in 1871 as Kinston Collegiate Institute and retained that name for the next 11 years. Founded by Joseph H. Foy, the school [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
La academia militar oficial
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
Laurinburg Normal and Industrial Institute
by Wright, Marilyn. The Laurinburg Normal and Industrial Institute was established in 1904 by Emanuel Montee McDuffie and his wife, Tiny, educators who had traveled from Alabama in response to a request by the African [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Louisburg College
by Willard, George-Anne. Louisburg College in Louisburg is recognized as the oldest chartered two-year, church-related coeducational college in the United States. The institution evolved from three earlier institutions. The [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Louisburg Female Academy
by Willard, George-Anne. North Carolina General Assembly on 27 Dec. 1814 and opened with 23 students on 23 Aug. 1815. The first principal of Louisburg Female Academy was Harriet Partridge Bobbitt, who served from 1815 to [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Louisburg Male Academy
by Willard, George-Anne. Louisburg Male Academy, known as Franklin Male Academy until the late 1820s, was chartered by the North Carolina General Assembly on 6 Jan. 1787 and rechartered on 18 Dec. 1802. Located on the east [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Lovejoy Academy
by McGee, David. Lovejoy Academy was established in 1842, when Jefferson Madison Lovejoy decided to open his Classical and English School in Raleigh. Lovejoy's school occupied an existing school building on Burke [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Manual Labor Schools
by Fowlkes, Jim. Manual labor schools were the forerunner of the North Carolina Community College System. They were created to provide an education that would help young people become working members of their [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mars Hill University
by Martin, James I., Sr. Mars Hill University by James I. Martin Sr., 2006. Originally published as, "Mars Hill College." NCpedia update: Mars Hill College changed its name to Mars Hill University in 2013. Mars [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Martin Academy
by Hughes, Nathaniel C., Jr. On 9 May 1783 the North Carolina General Assembly granted a charter authorizing John Causon, Hezekiah Balch, Samuel Doak, and others to organize Martin Academy in Washington County (now in Tennessee) [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Naming Schools
by Crissman, Cris. Daniel Boone may not have been much of a speller, and he may have never traveled near Mamers, North Carolina, but he has always been one of my favorite larger-than-life heroes because of that early [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
New Bern Academy
by Farnham, Thomas J. New Bern Academy was established in March 1764 when the North Carolina legislature authorized the town of New Bern to build "a House for a school and Residence for the School Master" and appointed [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Classical, English, and Mathematical School
by Murray, Elizabeth Reid. North Carolina Classical, English, and Mathematical School by Elizabeth Reid Murray, 2006 The North Carolina Classical, English, and Mathematical School—at times also called North [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina College
by Williams, Wiley J. North Carolina College was opened in 1852 in Mount Pleasant as Western Carolina Male Academy. The school was organized by the North Carolina Synod of the Lutheran Church as "a high school of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Historically Black Schools Timeline
by Alston, Christine. North Carolina Historically Black Colleges and Universities Timeline by Christine Alston and Kelly Agan, 2016.   Prior to the Civil War ending in 1865, there were only a few higher [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
North Carolina Military Academy
by Anderson, Jean B., Ireland, Robert E. The North Carolina Military Academy, also called the Hillsborough Military Academy, was established in Hillsborough in 1859 by Charles C. Tew, a graduate of The Citadel, and chartered in 1861. While [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Military Institute
by Andrew, Rod, Jr. North Carolina Military Institute by Rod Andrew Jr., 2006 The North Carolina Military Institute, a state-supported military school, opened in Charlotte in 1859. North Carolina by that time had [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics
by Stevenson, Alesia K. The North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics opened in Durham in 1980. Governor Terry Sanford had first proposed the concept of a public residential science and mathematics school in the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina School of the Arts
by Whittenburg, Catherine A. The North Carolina School of the Arts in Winston-Salem was established in 1963 by the North Carolina General Assembly as the nation's first state-supported residential school of the arts. A [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Oak Ridge Military Academy
by Stoesen, Alexander R. Oak Ridge Military Academy traces its origins to 7 Apr. 1850, when local citizens "desirous of promoting the cause of education" met and appointed a board of trustees to secure funds to erect a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Old Field Schools
by Norris, David A. The state of North Carolina did not take an active role in establishing a statewide system of public schools until the General Assembly passed a public school law in 1839. Before that time, there [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Palmer Memorial Institute
by Wadelington, Charles W. Palmer Memorial Institute by Charles W. Wadelington, 2006 See also: Charlotte Hawkins Brown Museum. The Palmer Memorial Institute, located between [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pitt Academy
by Norris, David A. Pitt Academy in Greenville was first granted a charter by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1786, but there is no evidence that the school opened until 1814. That year the General Assembly [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Powell, Sallie: Determined To Teach
by Cecelski, David S. I visited Sallie Powell in Elizabethtown, in Bladen County, in the state's southeast corner. In the era of segregated schooling, she was one of a remarkable generation of African-American teachers [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Private Education- Part 3: Antebellum Growth, the Civil War, and the First African American Colleges
by Powell, William S., Nash, Jaquelin Drane, Weaver, Robert D., Myers, Chris. Private Education by Chris Myers and Jaquelin Drane Nash, 2006 Additional research provided by William S. Powell and Robert D. Weaver. See also: Public Education; Bennett College; Bingham [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Public Schools in North Carolina in the Great Depression
by Davis, Anita Price. Public Schools in the Great Depression Keeping the doors Open by Dr. Anita Price Davis Reprinted with permission from The Tarheel Junior Historian, Spring 2010. Tar Heel Junior Historian [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Raleigh Academy
by Cross, Jerry L. The Raleigh Academy was established when the North Carolina General Assembly, responding to an 1801 petition from prominent citizens, passed an act to establish a school for both boys and girls and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ravenscroft School
by Pruden, William H., III. Ravenscroft School in Raleigh is believed to have grown from an Episcopal parochial school begun in 1868. Befitting its association with Christ Church, the school was originally housed in the Sunday [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ravenscroft School for Boys
by Wright, Ann S. Ravenscroft School for Boys opened in Asheville in 1856 on land purchased by the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina. The Diocesan Convention of 1854 had agreed to establish a church school for boys [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Roanoke Institution
by Williams, Wiley J. The Roanoke Institution was established in 1829 in Littleton, between Warrenton and Halifax in what was then Warren County. The institution was under the general direction of Capt. Alden Partridge of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Sacred Heart College
by Williams, Wiley J. Sacred Heart College by Wiley J. Williams, 2006 Sacred Heart College, a Roman Catholic liberal arts college for women in Belmont, was founded in 1892 at the request of Leo Haid, bishop and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Saint Augustine's University
by Wadelington, Charles W. Saint Augustine's University [formerly St. Augustine's College] by Charles W. Wadelington, 2006 See Also: Historically Black Colleges and Universities; Episcopal Church; Private Education; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Salem Academy and Salem College
by Fullington, Martha Walker. Salem Academy and Salem College See Also: North Carolina Women's Colleges; Private Education by Martha Walker Fullington, 2006 Salem Academy and Salem College trace their origins to [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Salisbury Academy
by Linn, Jo White. Salisbury Academy by Jo White Linn, 2006 See also: Liberty Hall Salisbury Academy had its origins in Liberty Hall, an institution established by the Presbyterian Church in Charlotte in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Samarcand
by . Samarcand By Research Branch, North Carolina Office of Archives and History, 2006 https://www.ncdcr.gov/about/history/division-historical-resources/nc-highway-historical-marker-program/ See [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Schools for Freed Peoples, 1860s
by Sandifer, Alex, Renfer, Berry Dishong. Schools for freed peoples By Alex Sandifer and Berry Dishong Renfer Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian, Fall 2003. Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, NC Museum of [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Scruggs, Lawson Andrew
by Murray, Elizabeth Reid. Scruggs, Lawson Andrew by Elizabeth Reid Murray, 1994 Related Entries: African American; Civil Rights; Historically Black Colleges 15 Jan. 1857–1914 Lawson Andrew Scruggs, physician, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
South Lowell Academy
by Anderson, Jean B. South Lowell Academy by Jean B. Anderson, 2006 South Lowell Academy was the inspiration of John Archibald McMannen, a lay preacher of the Methodist Church, and his close friend, Claiborn [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary
by Jonas, Glenn. Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary by Glenn Jonas, 2006 See Also: Baptists; North Carolina Baptist Historical Collection; Sandy Creek Baptist Association;Southern Baptist [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education
by Brabham, Robin. Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education by Robin Brabham, 2006 See also: Pupil Assignment Act. Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education, argued before the U.S. Supreme [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Thomasville Female College
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Thomasville Female College was a nineteenth-century academy for girls that grew out of a series of previously established Christian schools in the Davidson County town of Thomasville. The school's [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Vine Hill Academy
by Gammon, David Bryant. Vine Hill Academy in Scotland Neck was chartered in 1809 by the North Carolina legislature and became one of the most successful schools in the eastern part of the state. Its first trustees were [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Warrenton Female Academy
by Anderson, Jean B. Warrenton Female Academy was founded by Jacob Mordecai (1762-1838) in 1809 as a means of livelihood after his commodities brokerage was bankrupted by the Embargo of 1807. Over the years, he was [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Williams-King, Alethea: The Widow's Mite
by Cecelski, David S. When Alethea Williams-King moved to Blounts Creek, she was impressed how deeply her neighbors cared for an old plank building that used to be the community school. It was the Ware Creek Rosenwald [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Wilson, Alexander
by Copeland, J. Isaac. Alexander Wilson, educator and Presbyterian clergyman, was born in Newforge, near Belfast, Ireland. He was the son of Alexander Wilson, Sr., a descendant of one of the Scottish families that had [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wright, Charles Calvin
by Self, Lois S. Charles Calvin Wright, educator, school administrator, and religious and civic leader, was born on a small farm at Hunting Creek in Wilkes County and lived there all of his life. His [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
York, Brantley
by King, William E. York, Brantley by William E. King, 1996 3 Jan. 1805–7 Oct. 1891 Brantley York, Methodist clergyman, educator, lecturer, and author, was born near Bush Creek [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Zion-Parnassus Academy
by Suther, Steve. The Zion-Parnassus Academy was an eighteenth-century classical school located in Rowan County about a mile east of Thyatira Church (believed to be the oldest Presbyterian church in western North [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
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