Pastimes

Pastimes
Amusement Parks
by Anderson, Norman D. Amusement parks began to appear in North Carolina in the late 1800s and grew in popularity during the first half of the twentieth century. Some parks started out as swimming holes and picnic groves, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Aquariums
by Hairr, John. Aquariums owned and operated by the state of North Carolina are found in three locations along the Atlantic Coast. First opened in 1976, primarily as research facilities whose focuses shifted due to [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Averett, Ben: Doing It Right
by Cecelski, David S. I had been hearing about Ben Averett's annual Brunswick stew for years. Every October since 1967, Averett has scrubbed out a 25-gallon black iron wash pot, built a hardwood fire under it and prepared [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Blind Tiger
by Powell, William S. "Blind tiger" was a term of unknown origin applied to establishments that sold liquor during Prohibition. Newspapers and other publications in North Carolina in the 1920s used it as a synonym for [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Carolina Hotel
by Pleasants, Julian M. In June 1895 James W. Tufts, a successful Boston manufacturer, came to North Carolina seeking a healthy and mild climate. After purchasing 5,890 acres for approximately $1.00 per acre in the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cataloochee Ranch and Ski Area
by Wright, Marilyn, Wyche, Kathleen B. Cataloochee Ranch and Ski Area, the first ski slope south of Virginia, encompasses approximately 1,000 acres on a ridge above Maggie Valley in Haywood County. Forester Tom Alexander and his wife [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Chautauqua
by Powell, William S. Chautauqua was an adult educational program established in 1874 by leaders of the Methodist Episcopal church on the shores of Lake Chautauqua, N.Y. From this base, programs spread to many parts of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Circuses
by Powell, William S. Circuses were considered by many to be both educational and entertaining when they began to appear in early nineteenth-century North Carolina. Along with dancing and the theater, the circus came to [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cockfighting
by Sumner, Jim L. Cockfighting in North Carolina dates from the colonial period. A cockfight involves two specially bred gamecocks equipped with steel gaffs attached to each leg fighting until one is disabled. The [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Dog Racing
by Stick, David. Dog racing and the pari-mutuel betting that came along with it had a short life in North Carolina, extending only from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. In the period of rapid growth after World War [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Dulcimer
by Troxler, Carole Watterson. Dulcimer by Carole Watterson Troxler, 2006 Settlement schools in the southern Appalachian Mountains at the start of the twentieth century nurtured elements of mountain culture they believed [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Elizabeth II
by Latham, David W. The Elizabeth II, a historic attraction on Roanoke Island, is a 69-foot, square-rigged sailing ship representative of the Elizabethan vessels used to carry the first English colonists to the New [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Everett, Mary: The End Of The Century Book Club
by Cecelski, David S. Mary Everett belongs to one of the state's oldest book clubs, the End of the Century Book Club in Greenville. For its 100th anniversary celebration last year, Everett studied the club's minutes, [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Fishing Camps
by Stick, David. Fishing camps of primitive design were maintained by crews of commercial fishermen at isolated spots along the North Carolina coast during the last half of the nineteenth century and the early part [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fishing, Recreational
by Bumgarner, Sheila, Hegyi, Laura. With a primary season stretching from spring through fall and practically no age, gender, or economic barriers to its enjoyment, fishing is one of the most popular outdoor sports in North Carolina. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Gambling
by Homrighaus, Ruth E. Although illegal in North Carolina since 1764, when a law was enacted limiting personal winnings in any game of chance to five shillings a day, gambling continues to flourish in both legitimate and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Gander Pulling
by Wright, Marilyn. Viewed from the perspective of contemporary Virginians and South Carolinians, North Carolina in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries seemed to exhibit a rough, "backwoods" character [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Gouging
by Sumner, Jim L. Gouging, also known as "no-holds-barred" or "rough-and-tumble" fighting, was an especially violent form of fighting popular in the antebellum southern backcountry. A mixture of boxing, wrestling, and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hunting
by Williams, Wiley J., Hegyi, Laura. Hunting in North Carolina is a popular and economically significant recreational activity as well as an important focus of the state's governmental agencies in charge of wildlife preservation and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
John Kuners
by Steelman, Bennett L. John Kuners (also known as John Kooners, John Canoes, Junkanoes, or Jonkonnu) were troupes of slaves and free blacks, brightly dressed and often masked, who sang and danced on Christmas and New [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
La trucha de agua fresca del estado
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
Mooning
by Powell, William S. Mooning means to expose the bare buttocks as a challenge or a taunt. Although it was undoubtedly used previously in some settings, the word first came to national attention after it appeared in a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Colored Industrial Association Fair
by McKown, Harry. On November 18, 1879, the North Carolina Colored Industrial Association Fair opened in Raleigh at the site of what had been a military hospital. Thousands of African Americans flocked to the state [...] (from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries.)
Perry, Norman: Redbone Hounds And Wood Pile Dogs
by Cecelski, David S. They call him "Big Norm" in Bertie County. His name is Norman Perry Sr., and he's 82 years old, tough as old leather, and passionate about big swamps, hot-nosed dogs and coon hunting. He has been a [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Powell, Sallie: Mr. Dewitt's Lake
by Cecelski, David S. I visited Sallie Powell in Elizabethtown to learn about an all-but-forgotten landmark of African-American history: the swimming beaches and campground at Jones Lake. Created in 1939, Jones Lake State [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Ring Tournaments
by Towles, Louis P. Ring tournaments were relics of the medieval sport of jousting, dating from the eleventh until the fifteenth century. Rather than trying to knock another rider down, as in jousting, a ring tournament [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Sailing
by Stick, David. Sailing by David Stick, 2006 Sailing has been a popular form of outdoor recreation on the sounds, lakes, and rivers of North Carolina since the days when handmade log canoes were the most [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Shag Dancing
by Baxley, Laura Young. The shag is a popular dance most commonly associated with the beach towns of NorthCarolina and South Carolina. It is a two-person, male-led dance with a basic step that allows much room for [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Surfing
by Stick, David. Surfing by David Stick, 2006 See also: Windsurfing. One of the first instances of a Hawaiian-type surfboard being constructed and used on the North Carolina coast was in the late 1930s, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
The June Germans
by Gaddis, Elijah. The June German once occupied a prominent place in the cultural life of eastern North Carolina. These yearly dances began in the late nineteenth century as a yearly diversion for the wealthy elites [...] (from NCpedia.)
The New Leisure: The Birth of Recreation, North Carolina 1870-1920
by Parramore, Thomas C., Watson, Harry L., Nathans, Sydney, Anderson, Jean Bradley, Clayton, Thomas H., Fenn, Elizabeth A., Wood, Peter H. By Elizabeth A. Fenn, Peter H. Wood, Harry L. Watson, Thomas H. Clayton, Sydney Nathans, Thomas C. Parramore, and Jean B. Anderson; Maps by Mark Anderson Moore. Edited by Joe A. Mobley. [...] (from The Way We Lived in North Carolina, NC Office of Archives and History and UNC Press.)
The Origin of Miniature Golf and "Thistle Dhu"
by Boznos, Chris. North Carolina is not only "First in Flight," but also first in the flight of fancy that is miniature golf. The tiny courses now covering not only the United States but the world were born in the [...] (from NCpedia.)
Tweetsie Railroad
by Minsley, Brad. Tweetsie Railroad, the central attraction of a "Wild West" theme park of the same name in Watauga County, dates back to 1866, when the Tennessee legislature granted the East Tennessee & Western [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
White-Water Rafting
by Hoffman, Joseph Paul. White-water rafting is a large and economically significant tourist industry in the North Carolina mountains, with hundreds of thousands of visitors flocking to experience the challenge of running [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
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