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Confederate Monument, Salisbury NC

Fame Confederate Monument
Salisbury
View complete article and references at Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina at: https://docsouth.unc.edu/commland/monument/67

Description: A bronze statue of the muse Fame supports a defeated and dying soldier who clutches his gun; Fame, a winged figure dressed in robes and wearing a laurel wreath atop her head, holds a second wreath high into the air as if to place it on the soldier. The statue stands on a pink granite pedestal. From the bottom of the pedestal to the top of the bronze grouping, the monument measures almost 23 feet.


The United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) chapter decided on the statue in 1901. The completed statue arrived in Salisbury in 1905, but the land that the monument sits on wasn't deeded to the UDC until 1908 by the Salisbury Board of Aldermen and Mayor.


Images:
Contemporary view |
View from the intersection of West Innes and Church Streets |
Rear view |
Front inscription |
Left inscription |
Right inscription |
The muse and the soldier |
With St. John's Lutheran Church in the background


Inscription:
Southeast (front) base:

IN MEMORY OF /
ROWAN'S /
CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS /
THAT THEIR HEROIC DEEDS /
SUBLIME SELF-SACRIFICE /
AND UNDYING DEVOTION /
TO DUTY AND COUNTRY /
MAY NEVER BE FORGOTTEN /
1861-1865


Northeast (right) base:
THEY GAVE THEIR /
LIVES AND THEIR FORTUNES FOR /
CONSTITUTIONAL LIBERTY /
AND STATE SOVEREIGNTY /
IN OBEDIENCE TO THE TEACHINGS OF THE /
FATHERS WHO FRAMED /
THE CONSTITUTION /
AND ESTABLISHED THE /
UNION OF THESE STATES


Southwest (left) base:
SOLDIERS OF THE /
CONFEDERACY /
FAME HAS GIVEN YOU /
AN IMPERISHABLE CROWN /
HISTORY WILL RECORD /
YOUR DARING VALOR /
NOBLE SUFFERINGS AND /
MATCHLESS ACHIEVEMENTS /
TO THE HONOR AND /
GLORY OF OUR LAND


Northwest (back) base:
DEO VINDICE / R.I.P.


Dedication date: 5/10/1909

Creator: Johnpaul Harris, Sculptor
Mike Roig, Sculptor


Materials & Techniques: Bronze statue, pink granite base.

Sponsor: Robert F. Hoke Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy

Cost: $11,500 total ($10,000 for the bronze grouping, $1,500 for the granite base)

Unveiling & Dedication: Frances C. Fisher Tiernan, a Salisbury native, writer and novelist, and daughter of Col. Charles Fisher, composed a poem for the unveiling.

Post dedication use: It has been suggested that the monument be moved, as more than one car has run into the granite base. It was restored in 1991 by the Hoke Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC). The repairs cost $14,000 and were completed by Karkadoulias Bronze Art Co. in Cincinnati. The UDC also celebrated the monument's centennial on May 9, 2009. The monument is occasionally used by the Hoke chapter of the UDC to commemorate specific Confederate soldiers by placing wreaths at the monument.

Subject notes: The dying soldier in the bronze grouping was modeled from an 1861 photograph of Confederate Lt. Henry Howe Cook of Franklin, Tennessee.

Location: Located at the intersection of West Innes and Church Streets, facing southeast. Access is limited due to traffic.

City: Salisbury

County: Rowan

Subjects: Civil War

Latitude: 
35.66841
Longitude: 
-80.47109
Subjects: 
Origin - location: 

Comments

This whole rediculous witch hunt is going to ruin the history of this country. You see back in the time period this all happened, slavery and indentured servatude was an acceptable practice. Now there were ones just like today that abuse the power they had and made it a true living hell for some people. There are others who adopted the slaves into their families and were treasured for their service.
Not only that but there weren't just black slaves, there were Chinese, American Indian, white, Hispanic, Irish, and probably many more that I haven't named. Also don't forget that it was several white people that had a hand in the underground railroad. That helped slaves flee to the north. So the north and south disagreed as to the right one wrong of the slave issue. They had a war and the winners of that war helped free all slaves. So, the south had to reinvent their ways of life because they didn't have their work force etc, which meant that if they wanted folks to tend their fields they had to pay them. It's funny to say but we are all slaves to money still to this day.

The fact that Fame and other Confederate commemoratives were erected long after the Civil War ended (50 years), but during the height of Jim Crow and White racist violence to de-emancipate and suppress Blacks, is indicative of their true purpose.

Red Hornet, the Union army destroyed entire cities in the south, Sherman burned hundreds of homes & towns & destroyed miles and miles of railroad tracks not to mention 300,000 men never came home from the war, add 25 years reconstruction to all of that & the south didn't have the money to pay for monuments or grave markers until the 1900s. Every monument erected at the time was dedicated to the men who sacrificed their lives to defend their homes & families. Why can't they honor the memory of their fallen the same as everyone else?

I don't see how an angel taking a man to heaven is racist. Black people fought in the war for the south against the north. Are you saying GOD is racist??? Would it make y'all feel better if it was a Yankee soldier?? Angel, soldier, doesn't matter Which War! She is a representative for all WARS! And don't ALL Soldiers deserve to have an Angel take them to Heaven. Soldiers don't have a color.

If this is true, then why not completely rededicate it to all servicemen and women from all wars of all races and all backgrounds? The daughters of the confederacy own the statue and the land it’s on and for them to rededicate it would be fine. But they will not.

I don't have a problem with housing these monuments in a museum dedicated to the treasonous acts of the South during the Civil war. But, it needs to be put in context. The South declared war against the United States of America. I feel sad for all who lost their lives during this treasonous war. But, the leaders who lead them to fight against the United States are the ones you should be angry with. Take down any statues that glorify this treason.

Anyone who vehemently denies the direct correlation between slavery, the Confederacy vs. the Union and the reasons behind the Civil War are in grand denial of some blatant truths. The South fought to uphold an establishment whose foundation WAS slavery, who can deny that? I'm sure it's much more comfortable to defend your culture of discrimination than it is to see facts for what they are. What an Anglo-Saxon privilege.

Folks, when you read the inscription quoted by "Chuck" on May 24, 2019, understand that the "constitutional liberty" is not a reference to any liberty granted by the US Constitution rather it refers to the Constitution of the Confederate States of America which enshrined the institution of Slavery and declared black persons naturally inferior to white. So, there is a clear and forthright connection between the erection of this statue to racism in its ugliest form - chattel slavery. There can be no justification for this statue to remain in its setting; it should be moved to a Confederate cemetery.

Also, know that the "Fathers" in the inscription are not the "Founding Fathers" of the American Republic, the USA; rather, it is a reference to those who led the Secession and formed the CSA.

The soldiers of the CSA, as brave and gallant as they were, fought for a shameful cause in an unnecessary conflict. They gave their lives, their limbs, and their futures to defend the establishment of a nation based upon racial inequality and chattel slavery. [See "The Cornerstone Address" by Alexander Stephens, VP of CSA,]

George Jones, where do you get the notion that the quote is referring to the Confederate Constitution? It is not. Apparently you are not aware that the conflict which led to the war included a desire by the North to change the 1787 Constitution. The South was fighting for that original Constitution, and its protection of Constitutional Liberty & States Rights. The South never framed a Constitution, per se. They just copied the US Constitution that they believed was correct, and added a few things to it. It's true that the original Constitution protected slavery, but there was a whole lot more going on to create the schism between the two. The Fame statue and others from that period were created for the profound sorrow that came about from so many war deaths, North and South. The memorials in the North were not aggrandizing the re-formed Union. They were memorializing the men who died for that effort. Memorials in the South not aggrandizing slavery. They were to memorialize men who died for the myriad of reasons that caused men to give their lives defending them. It is beyond ludicrous to suppose that 260,00 men gave their lives to defend slavery. They just did not want to be under the thumb of the North.

Dont move Fame it's over 100 years old true artwork. DOTR
Regards

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