14th Amendment, 2nd Section (1902)

14th Amendment, 2nd Section (1902)

Cartoon shows Congress as a fat man asleep in a hammock labeled "Law Enforcement." A broken blunderbuss, labeled "14th Amendment, 2nd Section," lies at his feet. A small black boy walks by holding a drum, but an elephant cautions, "Don't wake him up!" The second section of the 14th Amendment provided for reducing a state's apportionment in Congress if the state prevented any male from voting for any reason other than participation in a rebellion or other crime. There was agitation by various black groups in the early years of the 20th Century to enforce it, but no serious attempts by the Republican-led Congress were made. The artist, E. W. Kemble, was a prolific cartoonist and illustrator, best known for his portrayal of African Americans. (Image description from Library of Congress)

Cartoon shows Congress as a fat man asleep in a hammock labeled "Law Enforcement." A broken blunderbuss, labeled "14th Amendment, 2nd Section," lies at his feet. A small black boy walks by holding a drum, but an elephant cautions, "Don't wake him up!"
Citation (Chicago Style): 

Kemble, E. W. (Edward Windsor). "Congress-14th Amendment 2nd section/Kemble." 1902. Drawing. From Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2004679121/ (Accessed August 6, 2018).

Usage Statement: 

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