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Slavery
Coffin, Levi
by Hoskins, Mary Katherine. Levi Coffin, abolitionist, temperance leader, and philanthropist, was born in New Garden, Guilford County, a descendant of Tristam Coffin, who came to America in 1642 and was one of nine purchasers [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Colonization Societies
by Mitchell, Memory F., Canipe, Jeremy T. Colonization Societies were organized in the early nineteenth century to promote the relocation of African Americans, particularly free blacks, to places such as Haiti, Liberia, the American Midwest, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
David Walker's Appeal
by Hunter, Crystal. Born in Wilmington, N.C. in 1785, to a free mother and an enslaved father, David Walker, although deemed free by law, was no stranger to the “avaricious” (a term he uses throughout the Appeal to [...] (from NCpedia.)
Devereux, John, Jr.
by Armistead, Terrell L. Devereux, John, Jr. by Terrell L. Armistead, 1986 17 Dec. 1820–10 Apr. [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Dred
by Inscoe, John C. Dred, published in 1856, was Harriet Beecher Stowe's much-anticipated sequel to Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) in which she sought to further fan the flames of antislavery sentiment. The book was a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Emancipation
by Nash, Steven E. Emancipation by Steven E. Nash, 2006 See also: Contrabands; African Americans - Part 3: Emancipation Emancipation of enslaved African Americans in the South became official on 1 Jan. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Emancipation Day
by Towles, Louis P. Emancipation Day by Louis P. Towles, 2006 Emancipation Day in North Carolina was initiated on 1 Jan. 1865 at Union-occupied New [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Forced Migration of African Americans
by Farley, Jennifer. This African chant mourns the loss of Olaudah Equiano, an eleven-year-old boy who, in 1755, was kidnapped from his home in what is now Nigeria. He was purchased by a captain in the British Royal [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Free Produce
by Powell, William S. "Free produce" was the term applied to anything grown, manufactured, or otherwise produced by nonslave labor. The term came into use when abolitionists, particularly Quakers, agreed to avoid buying [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Free Soilers
by McGee, Barry. Free Soilers were members of an antislavery political party in the years before the Civil War that supported free distribution of government-owned lands. Most North Carolinians probably could have [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)

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