Bookmark and Share

Printer-friendly versionPDF version
Average: 5 (2 votes)

Buck Dancing

by Bruce E. Baker, 2006

See also: Clogging; Step Dancing.

Sheet music for "The Shuffling Coon" described as a "buck and wing dance," by John Rastus Topp,1897. Image from the Duke University Libraries Digital Collections. Buck dancing is a folk dance that originated among African Americans during the era of slavery. It was largely associated with the North Carolina Piedmont and, later, with the blues. The original buck dance, or "buck and wing," referred to a specific step performed by solo dancers, usually men; today the term encompasses a broad variety of improvisational dance steps.

In contemporary usage, "buck dancing" often refers to a variety of solo step dancing to fiddle-based music done by dancers primarily in the Southern Appalachians. Among North Carolinians, buck dancing is differentiated from clogging and flatfooting by the use of steps higher off the floor, a straight and relatively immobile torso, and emphasis on steps that put the dancer on his or her toes rather than heels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reference:

Mike Seeger and Ruth Pershing, Talking Feet: Buck, Flatfoot, and Tap: Solo Southern Dance of the Appalachian, Piedmont, and Blue Ridge Mountain Regions (1992).

Additional Resources:

Emmylou Harris: Buck Dancing, YouTube video, 3:28, posted by 1000Magicians, Oct 13, 2010. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DsIBS0l7Hqg (accessed October 11, 2012).

Driggs, Jeff. "A Brief History of Clog Dancing." Doubletoe Times Magazine. http://www.doubletoe.com/history.htm (accessed October 11, 2012).

Bradley, Sandra Lee. "The Social Context of Buck Dancing in North Carolina in the 1940s." M.S. Thesis, University of Washington. Seattle, Wash. 1978.

Image Credits:

Topp, John Rastus. "The Shuffling Coon." New York: Jos. W. Stern & Co. 1897. http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/hasm_b0405/

 

Authors: 

Comments

Comment: 

It has nothing to do with blacks. The blacks didn't have dancing as we understand it. This style of dancing came straight over from Britain. The reason it's so prominent in Appalachia is the same reason you still find some old Shakespeare-era English idioms there. The English and Scots settlers got a bit isolated from the rest of the country. No blacks were involved, understand? As for "blues", "ragtime", etc., those are African, not American, types of music. What happened was blacks saw white people dancing and tried to copy them. But they didn't actually copy, they exaggerated everything and turned it into their "style" if you can call it that. The same type of flawed copying happened in Mexico when the mestizos there tried to play Accordion or brass instruments like the German settlers. Instead they came up with a wild and comical version of their own.

Comment: 

History has different interpretations. If you have reference citations that support this alternative view, please list them. It will help researchers. Thanks!

Michelle Underhill, Digital Information Management Program

Add a comment

PLEASE NOTE: NCpedia will not publish personal contact information in comments, questions, or responses. Complete guidelines are available at http://ncpedia.org/comments.

Copyright notice

This article is from the Encyclopedia of North Carolina edited by William S. Powell. Copyright © 2006 by the University of North Carolina Press. Used by permission of the publisher. For personal use and not for further distribution. Please submit permission requests for other use directly to the publisher.

Grey Squirrel - Click me to return to the top of the page