Bookmark and Share

Slogans, slang, and sayings
Army Worm
by Powell, William S. Army Worm by William S. Powell, 2006 Army worm was the term applied to extortionists who followed the invading Federal army in the South during the Civil [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Beat the Bounds
by Powell, William S. To "beat the bounds," or "do procession," meant walking the boundaries of a property and, in ancient times, striking certain places with a rod in the presence of witnesses. In the American colonies, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Blind Tiger
by Powell, William S. "Blind tiger" was a term of unknown origin applied to establishments that sold liquor during Prohibition. Newspapers and other publications in North Carolina in the 1920s used it as a synonym for [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Buncombe
by Faulkner, Ronnie W. The word "Buncombe" has, along with its variations of "bunk" and "bunkum," entered American slang as a term synonymous with meaningless speech. The popular term for pretentious and nonsensical talk [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Carolana
by Butler, Lindley S. Carolana, "land of Charles," referred to the area south of Virginia granted on 30 Oct. 1629 by King Charles I to his attorney general, Sir Robert Heath. The grant was part of the Crown policy to [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Charlotte Three
by Powell, William S. Charlotte Three by William S. Powell, 2006 "Charlotte Three" was the term applied by journalists in the 1970s to James Grant, T. J. Reddy, and Charles Parker, African American civil rights [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Esse Quam Videri
by Barefoot, Daniel W. Esse Quam Videri, the state motto of North Carolina, is a Latin phrase meaning "to be rather than to seem." Its origins are traced to Cicero's essay titled "Friendship." Distinguished jurist and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Factory Cord
by Powell, William S. Factory Cord is identified as any cord or string not of home manufacture but produced at a factory or mill. The term was used prior to the Civil War in Piedmont North Carolina, where there were early [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
First at Bethel, Farthest to the Front at Gettysburg and Chickamauga, and Last at Appomattox
by Poff, Jan-Michael. "First at Bethel, Farthest to the Front at Gettysburg and Chickamauga, and Last at Appomattox" by Jan-Michael Poff, 2006 "First at Bethel, Farthest to the Front at Gettysburg and Chickamauga, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
First in Freedom
by Orvedahl, Ginny. "First in Freedom" is a slogan referring to the action of an assembly of representatives in colonial North Carolina that adopted a nonimportation agreement on 2 Nov. 1769. This document "took [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Page 1 -- {Next page}

Grey Squirrel - Click me to return to the top of the page