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Lloyd, Thomas

by L. H. Mceachern, 1991

d. August 1770

Thomas Lloyd, physician and justice of the peace, was a native of Philadelphia who moved to Wilmington, N.C., prior to 1765 and became a leader in local affairs. In various records he is referred to as esquire, colonel, and doctor. He bought several large tracts of land on the North East River, all in the Welsh Tract, and at least one lot in Wilmington. This was part of Lot 31 on Princess Street and adjoined one belonging to the estate of Colonel John Ashe. An active patriot, Lloyd, with John Ashe and Alexander Lillington, signed the message presented to Governor William Tryon during the Stamp Act resistance at Brunswick in February 1766. This paper stated that the people were determined to obtain redress of their grievances from the commanders of the warships then in the river.

An Anglican, Lloyd was buried in St. James's churchyard, Wilmington. The following inscription appears on his stone: "Beneath this Stone [are] deposited the Remains of Colonel Thomas Lloyd of the Family of Lloyds in Philadelphia. He deceased in the Month of August MDCCLXX, age [illegible]."

Lloyd's wife Rebecca and daughter Margaret survived him, Margaret not yet of age. Archibald Maclaine and Alexander Hostler, prominent citizens of Wilmington, were appointed his executors and gave bond of £9,000. The amount of the bond indicates that he left a substantial estate. In 1772 Rebecca was living at Second and Market Streets. On her death in January 1786, Margaret was appointed administratrix of the estates of both her father and her mother. No other children of Thomas and Rebecca Lloyd have been identified.

About 1792 Margaret Lloyd married James Moore (b. 2 Apr. 1761), the son of George Moore and the grandson of "King" Roger Moore. James's mother was Mary Ashe, the daughter of John Baptista Ashe. Margaret Lloyd and James Moore had three children: Thomas Lloyd, Julia Rebecca, and Ann L.

References:

Ida B. Kellam, St. James Church, Wilmington, North Carolina: Historical Records, 1737–1852 (1965).

Lawrence Lee, Lower Cape Fear in Colonial Days (1965).

New Hanover County Deed and Will Books (New Hanover County Courthouse, Wilmington).

Alexander M. Walker, New Hanover County Court Minutes, vols. 2–3 (1958).

The Wilmington Town Book, 1743–1778 (1973).

Additional Resources:

Ashe, John; Lloyd, Thomas; and Lillington, John Alexander. Letter from John Ashe, Thomas LLoyd, and John Alexander Lillington to William Tryon, February 19th 1766. William Saunders, ed., <i>The Colonial Records of North Carolina,</i> vol. 7 (Raleigh, N.C.: P.M. Hale, Printer to the State, 1886) , p. 178  Documenting the American South. University Library, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007. http://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.html/document/csr07-0072, (accessed December 4, 2013).

 

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Copyright notice

This article is from the Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, 6 volumes, edited by William S. Powell. Copyright ©1979-1996 by the University of North Carolina Press. Used by permission of the publisher. For personal use and not for further distribution. Please submit permission requests for other use directly to the publisher.

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