Bookmark and Share

Printer-friendly versionPDF version
Average: 3.9 (18 votes)

Honor and Remember Flag

by T. Mike Childs
NC Government & Heritage Library, 2012.

See also: State Flag

The Honor and Remember Flag at a ceremony at the National Congress of the Sons of the American Revolution in Phoenix, Arizona on July 9, 2012. Image from Picasa user George Lutz.On August 4, 2010, the North Carolina General Assembly designated the Honor and Remember Flag as a symbol to recognize members of the Armed Forces of the United States who died while serving their country (Session Law 2010-145). At that time, it was the fifth state to do so. As of 2012, there are 13 states that have recognized the Honor and Remember Flag, including Virginia and South Carolina.

The flag was created by George Lutz after the death of his son Tony in Iraq in 2005 while serving in the U.S. Army. The flag was unveiled on Memorial Day, 2008 by the nonprofit organization Honor and Remember, Inc. The organization works to have the flag adopted as a symbol by all 50 states. It presents personalized flags to the families of fallen service members with the name of the deceased and the place and date of death.

References:

Honor and Remember Inc. official website: http://www.honorandremember.org/

Quillin, Martha. "A flag for wars' fallen heroes." NewsObserver.com. August 5, 2010. http://www.newsobserver.com/2010/08/05/614902/a-flag-for-wars-fallen-heroes.html (accessed July 25, 2012).

Dys, Andrew. "New S.C. law endorsing flag was driven by York couple." HeraldOnline.com. July 19, 2012. http://www.heraldonline.com/2012/07/19/4124088/symbol-of-sacrifice-new-sc-law.html (accessed July 25, 2012).

Image Credits:

Lutz, George. "IMG_8410a.jpg." Phoenix, Arizona, July 9, 2012. Image from Picasa user George Lutz. http://picasaweb.google.com/116234483504842553074/SonsOfTheAmericanRevolutionNationalCongress?authkey=rnNCO78b-k0&feat=flashalbum#5763328757906285842 (accessed July 25, 2012).

Authors: 

Add a comment

PLEASE NOTE: NCpedia will not publish personal contact information in comments, questions, or responses. Complete guidelines are available at http://ncpedia.org/comments.

Grey Squirrel - Click me to return to the top of the page