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Cities
Asheville
by Bowman, Charles H., Jr. Asheville by Charles H. Bowman Jr., 2006 See also: Biltmore House; Buncombe Turnpike; Grove Park Inn; Thomas Wolfe Memorial; University of North Carolina at Asheville; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Asheville
by Gregory, Lisa. Asheville by Lisa Gregory Government & Heritage Library, 2010. See also: Pisgah National Forest; Biltmore House; Asheville (UNC Press) Asheville, whose namesake is North Carolina [...] (from NCpedia.)
Bath
by Norris, David A. Bath became the first incorporated town in North Carolina in 1705. The town also boasted the state's first library (1701), church (1734), and free school (ca. 1753). Bath is thought to be on or near [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bath
by Latham, Bea. The adage that “the grass is always greener on the other side” can in some ways be applied to the exploration of unknown lands hundreds of years ago. Were it not for the curiosity of the initial [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Calabash
by Barefoot, Daniel W. Calabash is a fishing and resort town situated on the Calabash River in southwestern Brunswick County. Dubbed the "Seafood Capital of the World" by a food editor of the New York Times, the small town [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cary
by Hyman, Rebecca. Cary, N.C. by Rebecca Hyman Government & Heritage Library, [...] (from NCpedia.)
Charles Towne
by Butler, Lindley S. Charles Towne on the Cape Fear River was the first overseas effort to colonize the Carolinas after the 1663 Carolina grant from Charles II to the eight Lords Proprietors. As early as 1662, William [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Charlotte
by Cockrell, David L. Charlotte by David L. Cockrell, 2006 See also: Banking; Bank of America; Charlotte, Battle of; Levine Museum of the New South; Queens University of Charlotte; University of North Carolina [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Charlotte
by Underhill, Michelle Czaikowski, Gregory, Lisa. Charlotte is the county seat for Mecklenburg County. Originally home to Native Americans of the Catawba tribe, it was settled by European immigrants about 1750 and established in 1768. The city was [...] (from NCpedia.)
City Beautiful Movement
by Huggins, Kay Haire. The City Beautiful movement, a loosely connected grassroots organization devoted to urban renewal, was influential nationwide in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Reacting to the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Durham
by Williams, Wiley J. Durham by Wiley J. Williams, 2006 See also: American Tobacco Company; Duke Homestead; Duke University; North Carolina Central University; North Carolina Museum of Life and Science; North [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Durham
by Case, Steven. Durham is the county seat of Durham County.  Originally, the land--through which a major Native American trading route passed--was inhabited by such tribes as the Occaneechi and Eno.  The [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Fayetteville
by Parker, Roy, Jr. Fayetteville by Roy Parker Jr., 2006 See also: Fayetteville State University; Fort Bragg; Museum of the Cape Fear; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fayetteville
by Case, Steven. Fayetteville is the county seat of Cumberland County.  It was authorized in 1783, renaming the already amalgamated towns of Campbellton and Cross Creek (or Upper and Lower Campbellton) for the [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Greensboro
by Williams, Wiley J. Greensboro by Wiley J. Williams, 2006 See also: Eastern Music Festival; Greensboro College; Greensboro Sit-Ins; Guilford Courthouse, Battle of; Jefferson-Pilot Corporation; North Carolina [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Greensboro
by Snow, Helen, Cole, Tim. Guilford County’s establishment pre-dates that of Greensboro by nearly four decades (the county was constituted from parts of Rowan and Orange counties in 1771), and its early settlers were chiefly [...] (from NCpedia.)
Greenville
by Case, Steven. Greenville is the county seat of Pitt County. It was established by statute in 1771 (incorporated 1774) as Martinsborough, named in honor of Josiah Martin, the last Royal Governor of the colony. The [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Halifax
by Moody, Monica. Halifax, located in Halifax County, was in colonial times an important political, social, and commercial center in northeastern North Carolina. The town of Halifax was chartered by the General [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Haywood
by Daniels, Dennis F. Haywood "The Loss of a Town" by Dennis F. Daniels Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian. Spring 2005. Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, NC Museum of History The [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
High Point
by McCaslin, Richard B. High Point by Richard B. McCaslin, 2006 See also: Furniture; International Home Furnishings Market. High Point, in southwest Guilford County, is a center of the wood furniture industry [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Jacksonville
by Case, Steven. Jacksonville is the county seat of Onslow County. It was authorized in 1842, but lack of action by the county commissioners prompted the General Assembly to abrogate the act and re-authorize the [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Largest cities in NC
by Underhill, Michelle Czaikowski. Largest Cities in North Carolina Ten NC Cities with the largest estimated populations in 2011: 1. Charlotte (Mecklenburg county). 751,999 2. [...] (from NCpedia.)
Princeville
by Hill, Michael. Princeville, an Edgecombe County town incorporated in 1885, originated in 1865 as a resettlement community for ex-slaves. At the close of the Civil War, when Union troops occupied the area around [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Raleigh
by Williford, Jo Ann. Raleigh by Jo Ann Williford, 2006 See also: Capitals, Colonial and State; Joel Lane House; Meredith College; North Carolina Museum of History; North Carolina Museum of Art; North Carolina [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Raleigh
by Allen, Christy E., Hyman, Rebecca. In 1787, the North Carolina legislature voted that the Constitutional Convention (appointed to discuss the new federal constitution) should decide on the location of North Carolina's state capital. [...] (from NCpedia.)
Raleigh History: References and Additional Resources
by Gregory, Lisa, Allen, Christy E. Raleigh: References and Additional Resources References and additional resources about Raleigh. View the main NCpedia entry about Raleigh. Online Resources  ::  Books  ::  [...] (from NCpedia.)
Round Towns
by Norris, David A. Round towns are incorporated towns in which the boundaries are fixed at a certain distance from a central landmark, forming a circle. In North Carolina round towns first arose in the early nineteenth [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Salem
by Stoesen, Alexander R., Lewis, Johanna Miller. Salem by Johanna Miller Lewis, 2006 Additional research provided by Alexander R. Stoesen. See also: Moravians; German Settlers Salem was officially established in 1772 [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Settlement Patterns
by DiNome, William G. Settlement Patterns by William G. DiNome, 2006 See also: German Settlers; Great Wagon Road; Moravians; Scottish Settlers; Swiss and Palatine Settlers; Welsh Settlers; Immigrant Colonies; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Soul City
by Gavins, Raymond. Soul City by Raymond Gavins, 2006 Soul City, a small town located one mile off U.S. 1 between Warrenton and Manson in Warren County, is a symbol of black economic aspiration fueled by the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Spencer
by Turner, Walter R. The town of Spencer, located near Salisbury in Rowan County, was named for one of the nation’s railroad leaders, Samuel Spencer. A native of Georgia, Samuel became the first president of Southern [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Wilmington
by Tetterton, Beverly. Wilmington by Beverly Tetterton, 2006 See also: Azalea Festival; Filmmaking; Fort Fisher; North Carolina, USS; Ports and Harbors; Shipbuilding; Wilmington & Weldon Railroad; Wilmington [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wilmington
by Rudersdorf, Amy, Hayden, Elizabeth. Wilmington by Elizabeth Hayden and Amy Rudersdorf Government & Heritage Library, 2010. See also: Wilmington (UNC Press) 2010 estimated population = 106,882 (NC State Data [...] (from NCpedia.)
Winston-Salem
by Hutcheson, John A., Jr. Winston-Salem by John A. Hutcheson Jr., 2006 See also: Moravians; R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company; Salem; Salem Academy and Salem College; Wachovia Corporation; Wake Forest University; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Winston-Salem
by Case, Steven. Winston-Salem is the county seat of Forsyth County.  It was formed in 1913 from the amalgamation of the towns of Winston (established 1849) and Salem (established 1766). Winston was named for [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
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